#SDBWP #SDBWPcmFAwowHnmGSL | Brand Logos | Logo Legends | Brand Statements | Vision | Mission | Wings | Logos | Description | Motto | SunDeep World Productions #SDBWP   | Still Film 360 VR 3D Fine New World Media in Aerial Cinematic HDR UHD WCG HFR HDR10+ DCI 4k UHD Premium 3D 5D 8k 360 VR | SDBWP Top 48 Logos Finalised today from 100+ Designed in a Decade of Fine Art. Thanks for your feedback from all regions of the World. These logos will serve as face and soveigner of all releases under SDBWP and its wings under master HashTag #SDBWPcmFAWoWnmGS SDBWP Curated Media Tv FINE ARTS Wonders of World New Media gallery and studios 7sHDR 7sVFX 7sWCG 7s4kUHDPremium8k 7sHFR 7s360vrNonVR 7sFineWorldNewMediaStudios #FWNMS . Thanks for your feedback. Friends who have not messaged yet are welcome to message there views in future as this Web-Log will remain our one stop Logo Destination with all final Logos updated but will feature only Top 48 underwhom we are planning a release every 15 days So around 48 releases planned in a year . Highly Appreciate your messages. SDBWP Curated Media TV ” Where Awsome Fine World New Media Content Meets Great You ” | News Media Publishing #WorldBreakingNews | #HimReporter | #HimBreakingNews | #SDBCM | #SDBHR | SDB Fine Arts #SDBFA | SDB World Gallery | SDB FINE ARTS WONDERS OF WORLD GALLERY | SDB World Studios | #SDBWM | #SDBWorld | FINE WORLD MEDIA AUTHORITY #FWMA #FwmaSDBWP | WEDDING CINEMA | FINE ART WEDDING’s by SDBWP #FineWedSDBWP | FINE WED |  INDEPENDENT FILMS | SHORT FILMS | FINE ART  PHOTOGRAPHY #FapSDBWP | FINE WORLD DESIGNS AUTHORITY #FWDa | SDB WOW GALLERY | SDB FINE ARTS GALLERY | SDB INSTALLATIONS FINE ART | SDB ETHNIC FINE ART | SDB 111 WOW | SDB UNESCO WORLD HERITAGE SITES MEDIA | SOCIAL MEDIA EXPERTISE | NEW MEDIA BROADCASTING AUTHORITY | BLOGGING | VLOGGING | SOCIAL MEDIA NETWORK BROADCASTING | 7aCreativeLabs | 7sVFX STUDIOS | HDGT | ARTS ™® #SDBWPcmFA | Brand Statements | Vision | Mission | Wings of SDBWPcmFA |  Description | Motto | SunDeep World Productions #SDBWP  | Still Film Media in Aerial Cinematic HDR 4k UHD 3D 5D 8k FUHD 360 VR | Curated Media TV #CuratedMediaTV ” Where Awsome Fine World Media and Content Meets Great You ” | SDB World Studios | #SDBWM | #SDBWorld | FINE WORLD MEDIA AUTHORITY #FWMA #FwmaSDBWP | WEDDING CINEMA | FINE ART WEDDING’s by SDBWP #FineWedSDBWP | FINE WED |  INDEPENDENT FILMS | SHORT FILMS | FINE ART  PHOTOGRAPHY #FapSDBWP | FINE WORLD DESIGNS AUTHORITY #FWDa | SDB WOW GALLERY | SDB FINE ARTS GALLERY | SDB INSTALLATIONS FINE ART | SDB ETHNIC FINE ART | SDB 111 WOW | SDB UNESCO WORLD HERITAGE SITES MEDIA | SOCIAL MEDIA EXPERTISE | NEW MEDIA BROADCASTING AUTHORITY | BLOGGING | VLOGGING | SOCIAL MEDIA NETWORK BROADCASTING | 7aCreativeLabs | 7sVFX STUDIOS | HDGT | New Logos by FWDa | FINE WORLD DESIGNS’s AUTHORITY #FWDa MASTER Top 50 Logos Fine Art | Finalised till date from a decade of Design| Showreel in a Blogroll | Designed by #FWDa for wings of #SDBWPcmFAWoWgs | SunDeep Bhardwaj World Productions SDBWP Curated Media Tv FINE ARTS Wonders of World GALLERY and New Media STUDIOS | Deep HDR Productions #DHP | Deep WCG Productions #DWP | SDB Latent Himalayan and Himachal Productions | Seven Wonders of Himalayas by SDBWP #7WHS| Seven Wonders of Mandi #7WMS | Seven Wonders New Media Productions #7WNMP | Seven Wonderous Events Not To Miss In Mandi by SDBWP #7WEMS| Seven Wonderous Events Not To Miss in Himachal #7WEHS | Wonders of World by SDBWP 111WoW #SdbWoW| Himalayas by SDBWP #HimalayasSDBWP | Himachal by SDBWP #HimachalSDBWP | WORLD IS MY STUDIO #WIMS Productions | Travelled Filmed and Photographed 70+ Counties Across 6 Continents | 7sVFX Studios | 7rHDR Studios |SDB Fine World Studios #SFWS | Fine Wed | FINE ART WEDDIMG’s by SDBWP #FineWedSDBWP | Deep Neeti | Shayari Lab | Deep Vedas | Deep Brahamanas | Himalayan Deep Globe Trotter HDGT | Wedding Bells Film | iComCra International Coalition of Men and Child Rights Activists | SunDeepGlobeTrotter | Deep World Traveller | SDB Fine Arts Wonders of World gallery and New Media Studios | HDR 4k UHD Premium 8k 3D 5D 360 VR NON VR HFR HDR10+ Dolby Vision HLG New Media World Broadcasting Authority #NMWBA | Fine World Films | Fine Art Photography | New World Media Stories of 70+ Countries 555+ Destinations 111+ UNESCO World Heritage Sites Nearby 150+ International Airports in 2 Decades of World Travels and Fine Art Media Designs Still Film in Cinematic Aerial HDR HFR WCG DCI 4k UHD Premium 3D 360 VR Non VR HLG HDR10+ by SunDeepGlobeTrotter #SDGT

#SDBWPcmFAwowHnmGSL

SunDeep Bhardwaj World Productions Curated Media Tv FINE ARTS Wonders of World Heritage NEW MEDIA gallery and Studios

BRAND STATEMENTS

Short link http://bit.ly/SDBWPcmFA

VISION MISSION MOTTO

VISION

” SDBgtWP likes to create world fine arts , creative media , design , films , still , intangible & tangible things that outlasts us. In the process , we discovered 70+ countries across all 6 inhabited continents & world fine arts & new media , design , still photography & HDR 4k Full UHD 3D 5D 360 VR 8k aerial cinematic indie films productions and direction as a means for us to connect with our innerself. ” – #SDBFQ0

MISSION

To get to you top of the line future world media fine arts design film & still with latest tech of HDR 4k Full UHD 8k 3D 5D 360 VR VFX Aerial Cinematic Special Effects and Visual effects to cherish forever.

MOTTO

” World is my Studio

bit.ly/sdbworld

bit.ly/sdbcm

bit.ly/finewed

Travelled Filmed & Photographed 70+ Countries Across All Inhabited 6 Continents 111+ UNESCO World Heritage Sites 1700+ Places/Cities/Metropols/Towns/Villages/Suburbs/Countryside’s Nearby 150+International Airports in 2 Decades of World Travels

bit.ly/IntlAirSDB

SunDeep Bhardwaj World Productions Heritage Sites , Himalayas , Curated New Media , Blogging , Independent Short Films Productions , Vlogging , Publishing , Broadcasting #SdbFineArts

FINE ART WEDDING’s by SDBWP ™ ® bit.ly/FineWedSDB #FineWedSDBWP bit.ly/finewedsdbwp FineArtWeddingsBySdbwp.wordpress.com http://bit.ly/FineWedMap bit.ly/finewed

WEDDING CINEMA by SDBWP ™® Pre Post Wedding Still Films Fine Art http://bit.ly/FINEWED

SunDeep Bhardwaj

Founder/CEO/Owner ( SDBWP Curated Media Tv FINE ARTS ™® )

Aka :

SunDeep GlobeTrotter

SunDeep World Traveller

Pandit Sun Deep Neeti Vedas

Sun Social New Media Pundit

Himalayan Deep Globe Trotter HDGT

bit.ly/IntlAirSDBs

PRESS :

NEWSPAPER MAGAZINE INTERVIEWS ( HINDI & ENGLISH ) :

CMTV Blog simple TEXT READS

http://wp.me/p8e2AE-5b

http://wp.me/p8e2AE-5x

http://wp.me/p8e2AE-5t

http://wewp.me/p8e2AE-57

Scans Posts Clippings :

http://bit.ly/SDBinterviewFHp

http://bit.ly/SDBInterview

http://bit.ly/SDBHI or

Scan :

http://bit.ly/SDBHIorg

http://bit.ly/PressSDBInterviewMedia

SunDeep Bhardwaj World Productions ® bit.ly/sdbcm or wp.me/p8e2AE-8T

YouTube Channel :

bit.ly/SDBWPtv

SDB Facebook Pages & Profiles :

fb.com/SunDeepBhardwaj

fb.com/SunDeepKullu

fb.com/SunDeepHimachal

fb.com/SunDeepGlobeTrotte

WORLD TRAVELLER , ENTERPRENEUR & VISIONARY , FILMMAKER , FINE MEDIA ARTIST ,

GLOBE TROTTING TO 70+ Countries 555+ Destinations 111+ UNESCO World Heritage Sites 1700+ Places/Cities/Metropols/Towns/Villages/Suburbs/Countryside’s Nearby 150+ International Airports Across All Inhabited 6 Continents in 2 Decades of World Travels ( Travelled , Filmed & Photographed )

PAST WORK EXPERIENCE IN 5 STAR INTERNATIONAL AIRLINES , HOTELS/RESORTS & MNC BANKS

Varied Positions :

**** Business Development Manager, Manager , Manager ( Sales & Marketing ), Trainer , Executive , Flight Operations , Business Analyst , Supervisor & Team Leader

INTERNATIONAL AIRLINES PAST EXPERIENCE :

***** 5-Star International Airlines ( Qatar Airways – SkyTrax Best Airline for International Travel Best Airline in the World , Airline of the year , Best Intercontinental Airline – Multiple Awards ) A decade long Work Experience in International Airlines.

5 STAR HOTELS & MNC’s PAST EXPERIENCE :

***** 5-Star Hotels & Resorts ( Quality Inns MNC Chain , Oberoi’s Hotels, Resorts & Palaces – Oberoi’s Rajvilas Jaipur & Sea Princess Hotel Juhu Beach , Mumbai ) &

***** MNC Banking – ( American Express Research Center , Gurgaon , Delhi NCR )

Education :

– M.B.A ( Master’s – Sales & Mktg.) Symbiosis, Pune
– B.H.M.( Professional Degree in Hotel Management ) GCC Bangalore
– B.P.A. ( 3 Years Degree ) HPU , Summer Hills , Shimla ).

I believe ” HUMANITY IS THE BEST RELIGION ” – #SDBFQ1

” The thing differentiating great minds is that they have purposes and others have wishes ” – #SDBFQ2

” Allways being kind is more important than being right ” – #SDBFQ3

” I am a man of my principles , my ethics are my backbone ” – #SDBFQ4

” I am allways learning , implementing band developing with my visions and enterpreneurship skills the four pillars of growth ” – #SDBFQ5

” Follow Humanity & also read the holy books of Bible , Vedas , Chanakya Neeti , Upnishads , Quran , Guru Granth Sahib , Buddha & all other holy texts & scriptures to know the meaning & best practices of life & implement them in your life and pass this wisdom of knowledge to the future generations ” – #SDBFQ6

– SunDeep Bhardwaj ( Aka – SDB , Sandy Kaku , Himalayan Deep Globe Trotter , SunDeep GlobeTrotter , Himalayan Filmmaker , Himalayan Fine Artist )

#SDBFQ1 #DeepNeeti1 #DeepVedas1 #SdbFineQuotes #SDBFQ #DeepNeeti #DeepVedas

ADJECTIVES THAT BEST DESCRIBE ME :

Globe-trotter , Visionary , Enterpreneur, Fine Artist , World Traveller , Humane , Kind , Warm , Intellectual , Artistic , Believer in Humanity as Biggest Religion , Zeal to Curate best of Knowledge in all Holy Books , Vedas , Upnishads , Brahamans , Manu , Ranayana , Mahabharata , Bible , Kuran , Guru Granth Sahib & Buddha under banners ” Deep Brahamans ” , ” Deep Vedas ” and ” SuVichar ” , Leave something to Outlast myself in form of these texts and own Quotes in ” Deep Neeti ” & ” SDB Fine Quotes ” , ” Shayari Lab , ” Quotes Authority ” .

SDBWP CuratedMediaTv FINE ARTS ™® | SunDeep Bhardwaj World Productions ® 70+ Counties Across 6 Continents Travelled Filmed & Photographed in 2 Decades of Fine Art | bit.ly/sdbcm | SunDeepKullu.com | Himalayan Deep HDGT ™ | SunDeep GlobeTrotter SDGT ™ | 4k HDR 3D 5D 8k Full UHD 360 VR Spherical Panaroma Fine Art World Media Design Fine Prints Web Responsive AMP Publishing | Him Reporter | Pre Post Wedding Cinema | Online Album’s Invitational Portfolio Websites

FAR WEB 360 | Fine Art Responsive Websites for Mobiles Tablets Laptops Desktops | AMP Websites | Super Fast Loading Websites with Latest Tech | Blog Blog Photography Film Family Artist Portfolio Websites | Wedding Online Invitational Websites ( All Events in different posts with Password Protection ) | Wedding Portfolio Websites | Artist Portfolio Websites | Youtube Videos Vlogs Short Films Embedded Media in Fast Loading Websites | Minimalist Designs | DuoTone Designs | Pep Designs | Monotone Logos | Social Media Marketing | Content Creation | Photography | Videography | Cinematic Films | Designs

SunDeep Bhardwaj | Globe Trotter | Fine Artist | Fine World Media Studios | 7sVFX Studios | SDBWP | Blogs | Vlogs | Photos | Short films | Video Logs | Independent Films | Videos | Design | Fine Art Intallations | Weddings | Travelogues | 4K | HDR | 8K | UHD | 360 VR | SDBWP Curated Media Tv FINE ARTS ™® | SDB Fine Arts Wonders of World Gallery & Studio’s , Himachal , Himalayas | HDGT | Himalayan Deep Globe Trotter | Fine World Films | Him Indie Productions | Him Reporter | SDB World Studios | Fine World Films | WAFFA | World Aerial Fine Films Authority | Shayari Lab | Quotes Authority | Indie Films | Where Awsome World Fine Art Media & Content Meets Great You

FINE WORLD DESIGN’s AUTHORITY #FWDa http://bit.ly/FWDaDesigns

Elements of Nature Installations | SDB Fine Arts | Fine Installations by SunDeep Bhardwaj | Himachal | Kullu Naggar Manali | Sundernagar Mandi | Himachal | Himalayas

Installation Fine Art by SDBWP ™ WORLD IS MY STUDIO ™ 70+ Countries Across All Inhabited 6 Continents Travelled Filmed & Photographed 1700+ Places/Cities/Metropols/Countrysides/Villages/Towns 150+ International Airports Destinations In 2 Decades of World Travels

Deep Neeti ™ SunDeep Bhardwaj Neeti or Deep Niti is a quotes and writings of SDBhdgt @ SunDeep Bhardwaj World Productions SDBWP ™ Curated Media TV ™® and Shayari Lab ™ is Hindi Weblog of the same woth focis in Shayari & Quotes in Hindi and Suvichar and Vachans by SDB

Globe Trotter, Fine Media Artist, Product Creative Photography, Music Videos, Advertising Videos, Indie Filmmaker, Candid Wedding Pre Post Wedding Cinematographer, Short Commercial Films Director, StoryTeller, D.O.P. , Aerial Cinematography in 360°VR UHD 4k Full HD, Fine Art Photography, Graphic Media & Creative Digital Designs, Responsive Website Designs with 360° Media, UNESCO World Heritage Sites – Himalayas – Himachal – Wonders of World Travel Photographer, Landscapes, People, Culture, Heritage, Portraits, Cinematic Films, Social Media Pundit, Men & Child Rights Activist, Entrepreneur, Visionary

SDBWP Live Aerial Media is available on Live Streams & Webcasts

YOUTUBE Profile & Channel :

bit.ly/SDBWPtv or

YouTube.com/SunDeepBhardwaj

FACEBOOK
PAGE :

bit.ly/SDBWPpage 5500+ Likes

SDB PROFILE 1 : ( To Follow )

bit.ly/SDBKullu ( Full with Max Limit of 5k friends years back as active on Facebook allmost a decade before right from.launch of FB )

SDB PROFILE 2 : ( To Add a friend )

bit.ly/SDBHP

bit.ly/CuratedMedia

bit.ly/kullu 56,500+ Likes 1,05,000+ Check-ins 54,000+ followers

bit.ly/SDBhp 10,500+ Likes

bit.ly/BPEarth 13500+ Likes

bit.ly/Sundernagar

bit.ly/UnescoGHNP

GROUPS :

bit.ly/AOPWorld 3k+ Members

bit.ly/himachal

OFFICIAL BLOGS :

bit.ly/CuratedMedia

SunDeepKullu.com/blog

tumblr.SunDeepKullu.com/archive

WEDDING ALBUM DESIGNS :

http://bit.ly/FineWedDesigns

CANVERA :

http://bit.ly/CanveraFineWed

Official Website :

SunDeepKullu.com 180+ Countries Followers

(Destination Fine Arts Media Direction & Productions, 360°VR Stills & Immersive Videos, Aerial Cinematic Films in UHD 4k Full HD, Music Videos, Fine Art Media Designs Branding, Social Media Marketing, Fine Art Responsive 360° Website Designs, Fine Art Portraits, Model Shoots, Candid Stills & Cinematic Pre Post Wedding Films, Social Activism Short Films, Independent Films )

SDBWP MEDIA LINKS :

SDBWP™ AERIAL FILMS : bit.ly/SDBWPaerial

360 ° VR COMMERCIAL STILLS : bit.ly/360VRstills

MEDIA CAROUSAL SAMPLE FOR OUR COMMERCIAL RELEASES viewable only on Mobile :

http://bit.ly/CarousalSample

FLICKR PHOTOSTREAM :

v.gd/fluidr ( Popular )

flickr.com/photos/wittysam ( Recent )

INSTAGRAM :

bit.ly/SDBinsta

Add me Social using :

SDBWPcmFA@gmail.com ,

SunDeepKullu@gmail.com , WittySam@gmail.com ,

+91 7018153628 ( WhatsApp Jio Chat Video HD Voice 4G )

+91 9805305912 ( Airtel WhatsApp 2 Optional Roaming )

+91 8627802895 ( Airtel Roaming)

Others :

+974 5344547 ( International )
sb@sundeepkullu.com ( Optional )

* I AM A GLOBE TROTTER
* A FINE MEDIA ARTIST
* EARTH IS MY CANVAS
*‎ ENTERPRENEUR & VISIONARY
* MANAGE CURATED MEDIA TV , ONLINE E-COMMERCE BUSINESSES & ONLINE BRANDING & NEW MEDIA BROADCASTING
• AS A INDIE FILMMAKER , INDEPENDENT COMMERCIAL CINEMATIC SHORT FILMS I DIRECT & PRODUCE WITH DESTINATION WEDDING CINEMA @ FINE ART WEDDING’s by SDBWP PRE PIST WEDDING CINEMA
* FINE ART IN MY STILLS , DESIGNS & FILMS & 7sVFX STUDIO’s MEDIA
* MOUNTAINS MY FIRST LOVE
* AERIAL CINEMATIC 4k UHD HDR FILMs STILL 360° VR VFX MEDIA MY FORTE
* SOULFUL FINE ART MEDIA I FILM , DIRECT , PRODUCE , CURATE & WEBCAST AT SDBWP CURATED MEDIA Tv FINE ARTS ™®
* WORLD HIMALAYAS INDIA HIMACHAL ARE IN MY FOCUS AND WORK SPACE
*HIMALAYAS MY HOME AFTER TRAVELS TO 70+ COUNTRIES ACROSS 6 CONTINENTS IN DECADES OF GLOBE TROTTING
*WORLD IS MY STUDIO

BRANDS :

SDBWP Curated Media Tv FINE ARTS
Pre Post Wedding Cinema Photography Websites Designs Prints Films 4k 8k UHD 5D 360 VR HDR FILMS Live On Demand Media WebCasting Social Media Broadcasting Him Reporter News Media Publishing Journalism Fine World New Media Creatives Pre Post Productions & 7sVFXstudios

EXPANDED TITLES :

SDBWP Curated Media Tv FINE ARTS Pre Post Wedding Cinema Photography Responsive AMP Websites Creative Designs Premium Prints Films 4k 8k UHD 5D 360 VR HDR FILMS Live On Demand Media WebCasting Social Media Broadcasting Him Reporter WordPress News Media Publishing Journalism Blogging Vlogging WordPress Facebook YouTube Fine World New Media Creatives Pre Post Productions 7sVFXstudios SunDeep GlobeTrotter New Media Studios

LOCATIONS :

Destination Fine Art Media

Worldwide Himalayas Himachal

Himachal :
Sundernagar Mandi Ghumarwin Bilaspur Manali Naggar Kullu Dharamshala McLeodgang Palampur Baijnath Bir Billing Kangra Hamirpur Una Chamba Kinnaur Sirmour Solan Rohru Kotkhai Rampur Shimla Lahaul & Spiti

J & K
Jammu & Kashmir Srinagar Anantnag Kistawar Gulmarg

Delhi NCR Haryana Punjab & Chandigarh
Shimla Chandigarh Delhi Noida Gurugram

Rajsthan
Jaipur , Pushkar , Udaipur

Nepal Bhutan

Till date Media shot in 70+ Counties Across 6 Continents in 2 Decades of World Travels

Though we provide destination Fine Art Media anywhere under Sun and Sky these remain FINE WED’s popular destinations in recent years for assignments most recently. However in last few decades we travelled extensively to allmost 70 percent of World countries if we keep area of counties and there size in consideration and our work locations we’re mostly spread out in All 6 Inhabited continents and 70+ Countries Covering Biggest and Most Influencial World Countries and Largest in Area , Population or Development out of 195 UN Nation’s

SunDeep Bhardwaj World Productions | Curated Media TV | Fine Arts | Still & Films | 4k | 8k | Full UHD | HDR | VFX | 5D | 360 VR | Aerial Cinematography | Live | On Demand | Short Films | Documentaries | Vlogs | Travelogs | Wedding Cinema by SDBWP | Fine Art Photography | Fine Art Wedding’s by SDBWP | Fine World Designs Authority #FWDa | Painting Digital Arts | Linear & Vector Graphics | Fine Art Archival Paper Museum Quality Printing Framing | Premium Photobooks | Fine Art Album Designs | SuperCuts | Mix | Colour Grading | Adobe CC 2017/18 | Photo Manipulations | Retouching Art | After Effects | Premier Pro | Pre Post Productions | Fine World Films Studios #FWFs | SdbSuperEdits #SDBSE | Fine Art Installations | Commerical Media Assignments | Home | Business | Products | Real Estate | Hotels | Advertising | Videos | Fashion | Lifestyle | Celebrity | Artist | Portfolios | Videos | Short | Youtube | Films | Fine Art Archival Printing | Blogs | Web TV | Reality Web TV | Lifestyle Web TV | Web Channels | Curated Media | Curated Playlists | New Media | Curated | Trending | Popular | Viral | Interesting | Fine World Media Authority | SDBWP | Curated Media Tv | FINE ARTS | Pre Post Wedding Cinema | Photography | Websites | Designs | Prints | Films | 4k 8k Full UHD 5D 360 VR HDR FILMS | Live On Demand Media | WebCasting | Social Media Broadcasting | Him Reporter | WordPress | News Media Publishing | Online Journalism | Blogging | Vlogging | WordPress | Facebook | YouTube | Fine World Media Creatives | Pre Post Productions & | 7sVFXstudios

” Where Awesome Curated Fine Art World Media and Creatives Meets Great You “

bit.ly/sdbcm

WORLD IS MY STUDIO

SDBWP™ SUNDEEP BHARDWAJ WORLD PRODUCTIONS ™® 70+COUNTRIES 111+ UNESCO WORLD HERITAGE SITES 1700+ PLACES/METROPOLS/CITIES/VILLAGES/SUBURBS/RURAL/URBAN/COUNTRYSIDES/TOWNS NEARBY 150+ INTERNATIONAL AIRPORTS IN ALL INHABITED 6 CONTINENTS TRAVELLED , FILMED AND PHOTOGRAPHED IN A DECADES OF GLOBE TROTTING & MEDIA PRODUCTIONS

#HimBreakingNews
#WorldBreakingNews
#CuratedMediaTvLiveExclusive

Shayari Lab

Quotes Authority

Fine World Media Authority

SDB Fine Quotes

Fine World Media Authority

SuVichar Curated By SunDeep Bhardwaj

Brahmanas by SunDeep GlobeTrotter

DEEP NEETI ™ by SunDeep Bhardwaj SDB #DeepNeeti #SDBDN

DEEP VEDAS ™ by SunDeep Bhardwaj SDB from Ancient Holy Texts Applicable in Modern Times. Fine Collections from Brahamanas Vedas Upnishads Manu Samriti’s Stuti’s Puranas #DeepVedas #SDBDV

#SDBWPcmFA

SunDeep Bhardwaj World Productions #SDBWP

Curated Media TV #CuratedMediaTV

SDB FINE ARTS #SdbFineArts #WoWGallery #SdbInstallations #ElementsOfNatureIntallationArt #SdbWorldGalleryStudios

FINE WORLD MEDIA AUTHORITY by SDBWP #FwmaSDBWP #SDBWM #SDBworld SDB World Productions , Curated Media TV , Fine Arts , Breaking News – Worldwide/Himachal/Himalayas , Still , Film in Aerial Cinematic HDR 4k Full UHD 3D 5D 8k 360 VR ,

FINE ART WEDDING’s by SDBWP FINE WED Wedding Cinema #FineWedSDBWP #WeddingCinema #FineWed

FINE WORLD AERIAL CINEMATIC HDR FILMS 4k Full UHD 3D 5D 8k 360 VR HDR #FWachF

#FWF #FwfSDBWP #SDBWPworldinmotion #SDBWPnature #ElementsOfNatureFilmsbySDBWP#FWFlandscapes #FWFportraits #FWFcandidwedding #FWFculture #FWFpeople #FWFstreets #FWFWorldHeritageSites #FWFethnic #FWFwow #FWFunesco #FWFbpearth

FINE WORLD FILMS ™® FHD #FWF

WORLD AERIAL FINE FILMS AUTHORITY WAFFA™® Aerial Cinematic HDR 4K Full UHD 3D 5D 8k 360 VR #WAFFA

LATENT HIMACHAL PRODUCTIONS™® Aerial Cinematic HDR 4K Full UHD 3D 5D 8k 360 VR Still & Film #LatentHimalayas #LatentHimachal

LATENT HIMALAYAN PRODUCTIONS™® Aerial Cinematic HDR 4K Full UHD 3D 5D 8k 360 VR Still & Film #LatentHimalayas #LatentHimachal

HIM INDIE PRODUCTIONS in Aerial Cinematic HDR 4k Full UHD 3D 5D 8k 360 VR Still & Film #HimIndie

HIMACHAL FROM ABOVE in 4k Full UHD HDR Aerial 360 VR Cinematic Still & Film #Himachal4kAerialCinematicHDR

HIMALAYAS FROM ABOVE in 4k Full UHD HDR Aerial 360 VR Cinematic Still & Film #Himalayas4kAerialCinematicHDR

HIMACHAL SNOW LAP OF BEAUTIFUL HIMALAYAS #HSLH

BREATHTAKING PLANET EARTH #bpEarth 70+ Counties Across 6 Continents 111+ UNESCO World Heritage Sites 111WoWsdb

Work Locations : WorldWide India Himalayas ( Destination Fine Art Media in HDR DCI 4K Full UHD HDR 360° VR Panaroma Spherical Circular Video Aerial Cinematic films )

FINE ART PHOTOGRAPHY by SDBWP #FapSdbwp #FAP #SDBWPworldinstill #SDBWPnature #ElementsOfNatureFAPbySDBWP#FAPlandscapes #FAPportraits #FAPcandidwedding #FAPculture #FAPpeople #FAPstreets #FAPWorldHeritageSites #FAPethnic #FAPwow #FAPunesco #FAPbpearth

HIM REPORTER WORD PRESS #HRWP Online Journalism Curated Media TV #HimBreakingNews #WorldBreakingNews

NEW MEDIA BROADCASTING AUTHORITY #NMBA Webcasting Live Streaming On Demand YouTube Facebook Vimeo Metacafe Dailymotion Videos Media in Aerial Cinematic 4k Full UHD 3D 5D 8k 360 VR News Blog Vlog Online Social Media Broadcasting

FINE WORLD DESIGNS AUTHORITY #FWDa

FINE ART RESPONSIVE WEB 360 BRANDING DESIGN ECOMMERCE #FARweb360

7a Creative Labs 1) Automation 2) Artificial Intelligence (AI) Automatic Machine Learning 3) Applications 4) Advanced Technologies 5) Artistic Applications 6) Automation New Media 7) Automation Installations #7aCreativeLabs

7sVFX Studios

1)SDBWP 2)SuperExpose 3)SuperCuts 4)SuperEdits 5)SuperMix 6)SpecialEffects 7)SuperVFX (Visual Effects) Studios HDR 4k Full UHD 3D 5D 8k 360 VR Fine World Media #7sVFXstudios Still Fine Art Photography Graphic Designs Archival Printing Aerial Cinematic Filming Creatives #7sVFXstudios

#Sdb20171220_19:17

Sharing Short Link http://bit.ly/sdbwpcmfa

bit.ly/sdbcm

SunDeep Bhardwaj Globe Trotter

Founder/CEO/Owner

Travelled Filmed & Photographed 70+ Countries Across All Inhabited 6 Continents 111+ UNESCO World Heritage Sites 1700+ Places/Cities/Metropols/Towns/Villages/Suburbs/Countryside’s Nearby 150+International Airports in 2 Decades of World Travels

bit.ly/IntlAirSDB

SunDeep Bhardwaj World Productions ™® #SDBWP

SDBWP Curated Media TV ™® #CuratedMediaTV ” Where Awesome Fine World Media & Content Meets Great You “

SDB FINE ARTS Wonders of World Gallery & New Media Studios HDR 4k Full UHD 3D 5D 8k 360 VR Still Fine Art Photogpraphy & Film Elements of Nature Installations Fine Art , UNESCO World Heritage Sites , Himalayas , Curated New Media , Blogging , Independent Short Films Productions , Vlogging , Publishing , Broadcasting #SdbFineArts

bit.ly/sdbcm

WORLD IS MY STUDIO

#SDBWPcmFA

http://bit.ly/SDBWPcmFA

Latest reels :

FINE WORLD FILMS

WORLD AERIAL FILMS

HIM INDIE PRODUCTIONS

7s VFX Studios

HDR 4k Full UHD 8k 360 VR Aerial Cinematic Short Films Fine Art Photography

SunDeep Bhardwaj World Productions

FINE ART WEDDING’s by SDBWP

FINE WED

WEDDING CINEMA

WED CINE

Wedding Reels not Highlights

Full Wedding Highlights ( Old reels ) ( We do not publish our latest work online to avoid copying of our style by online world ) ( One to one session can be arranged for seeing our latest Showreels )

https://youtu.be/0IG3D0wL5r8

https://youtu.be/YqQye4w4vGI

https://youtu.be/cDnKsckTf8k

https://youtu.be/IzySKrMM62I

Pre Post Weddings Wedding Highlights

Designs

Casting

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How can you report about a particular issue directly to the Chief Minister of Himachal Pradesh Mr. Jai Ram Thakur ? How to Contact CHIEF MINISTER of HIMACHAL PRADESH Mr. JAI RAM THAKUR Effectively ? Contact Nos | Office Address | Government Links | Social Media Links | Twitter | Facebook Page | Official Email | E Samadhan

How can you report about a particular issue directly to the Chief Minister of Himachal Pradesh Mr. Jai Ram Thakur ?

If the urgency of your issue concerns with regards to the State or Nation or the Government you may be or probably a very serious issue to considered directly then you can meet contact the CM directly at his

http://admis.hp.nic.in/esamadhan/Citizen/SubmitGrievance.aspx

http://himachal.nic.in/en-IN/write-to-cm.html

Email address: jr.thakur@nic.in

Or visit him directly at his office address:

Chief Minister HP Secretariat,

Shimla – 171002

Or contact him at: 0177-0177-2625400, 0177-2625819, 0177-2624554

Taking your issue on social media

Probably the easiest way if you have a smartphone and you’re on social media to grab the attention of the CM if your issues are not be addressed in any other manner and it is a serious issue you are facing.

Go online type out your complaint tweet it to Jai Ram Thakur

Post it on Facebook at Jai Ram Thakur

WhatsApp him at +91 9418003048

Email him at jr.thakur@nic.in

Or contact him at the official website at http://www.himachalpr.gov.in/CmProfile.aspx

Public Grievances

You can post a complaint on the National Consumer Complaint Forum in two easy ways:

Fill in the Complaint Registration Form

And click submit.

Your issue would be registered and will be seen through by the consumer forum.

Make contact through an MLA

Go ahead and talk to your areas MLA as if he would address your situation to the CM he could get you a direct appointment with him.

Wait for the formal request to be returned back to you as it may take some time so plenty of patience is required while trying to make contact in any way what so ever.

Once you have the go ahead you may then commence with your plan on meeting the Chief Minister.

Write out a letter to the CM

Date

Shri. Jai Ram Thakur

HP Secretariat,

Shimla – 171002

Subject:

Respected Chief Minister Sir,

Write out whatever your issue, request or suggestion is, try keeping it short, simple and as powerful as possible which will help in catching the attention to your situation.

Name:

Mobile Number:

Email address:

Residence address:

Or

Appointment

Write out an online application at his official website (http://himachalpr.gov.in/CmProfile.aspx)

State your full name

Enter your current residence address

Enter your email address

Enter your mobile number

Enter your e-mail address

Enter your profession

Enter the department you are working under

Enter your subject

Write out to the Chief Minister or

And click submit.

What are the formalities required to reach out to the CM?

To reach out to the Chief Minister of HP
is obviously not an easy task considering that he is probably busy most of the time and this would require an ample amount of patience at times as it could take some time. There are some formalities that you much follow before you address the CM.

Fixing an appointment with him. Considering being the Chief Minister he is a busy person and may not have time instantly to follow up on everyone’s request unless the situation cannot be put aside.

Meet the areas local MLA if you are unable to meet with the CM directly, he may be your best option of getting you an appointment with the Chief Minister or may address your issues at a meeting.

Table of Contents [hide]

What are the formalities required to reach out to the CM?

Appointment

Write out a letter to the CM

Make contact through an MLA

Public Grievances

Taking your issue on social media

How can you report about a particular issue directly to the Chief Minister?

https://www.facebook.com/jairamthakurbjp/

This article may be your guide to getting in touch with the Chief Minister of Himachal Pradesh Shri. Jai Ram Thakur. The article consists of the different ways you can reach out to him over the internet if you are tech savvy or you could use the old fashion way of getting in touch with the CM

What are the different ways to reach out to the CM?

The most used way to reach out to the Chief Minister is through the online website that allows you to write to the CM of Himachal Pradesh

2. Contact him online:

Tweet the Chief Minister on Jai Ram Thakur

Even find the CM on Facebook Jai Ram Thakur

He is on WhatsApp as well according to officials.

HP Secretariat, Shimla

+91 177 2622204

+91 177 2621154

group1-hp[at]nic[dot]in

http://himachal.nic.in/en-IN/write-to-cm.html

http://admis.hp.nic.in/esamadhan/Citizen/SubmitGrievance.aspx

https://www.facebook.com/jairamthakurbjp/

How can you report about a particular issue directly to the Chief Minister of Himachal Pradesh Mr. Jai Ram Thakur ? How to Contact CHIEF MINISTER of HIMACHAL PRADESH Mr. JAI RAM THAKUR Effectively ? Contact Nos | Office Address | Government Links | Social Media Links | Twitter | Facebook Page | Official Email | E Samadhan

KNOW ALL ABOUT THE FESTIVAL OF COLOURS – HOLI Curated Media Tv

HAPPY HOLI | AROUND THE WORLD | FESTIVAL OF COLOURS | KNOW ABOUT HOLI | BEST VISUALS VIDEOS REMIXES SHORT FILMS | CURATED | SDBWP Curated Media TV

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Know all about HOLI

Holi ( /ˈhoʊliː/; Sanskrit: होली Holī) is a Hindu spring festival celebrated in the Indian subcontinent, also known as the “festival of colours”. It signifies the victory of good over evil, the arrival of spring, end of winter, and for many a festive day to meet others, play and laugh, forget and forgive, and repair broken relationships. It is also celebrated as a thanksgiving for a good harvest. It lasts for a night and a day, starting on the evening of the Purnima (Full Moon day) falling in the Vikram Samvat Hindu Calendar month of Phalguna, which falls somewhere between the end of February and the middle of March in the Gregorian calendar. The first evening is known as Holika Dahan or Chhoti Holi and the following day as Holi, Rangwali Holi, Dhuleti, Dhulandi,or Phagwah

Holi is an ancient Hindu religious festival which has become popular with non-Hindus in many parts of South Asia, as well as people of other communities outside Asia. In recent years the festival has spread to parts of Europe and North America as a spring celebration of love, frolic, and colours.

Holi celebrations start on the night before Holi with a Holika Dahan where people gather, perform religious rituals in front of the bonfire, and pray that their internal evil be destroyed the way Holika, the sister of the demon king Hiranyakashipu, was killed in the fire. The next morning is celebrated as Rangwali Holi – a free-for-all festival of colours,[8] where people smear each other with colours and drench each other. Water guns and water-filled balloons are also used to play and colour each other. Anyone and everyone is fair game, friend or stranger, rich or poor, man or woman, children and elders. The frolic and fight with colours occurs in the open streets, open parks, outside temples and buildings. Groups carry drums and other musical instruments, go from place to place, sing and dance. People visit family, friends and foes to throw coloured powders on each other, laugh and gossip, then share Holi delicacies, food and drinks. Some customary drinks include bhang (marijuana), which is intoxicating.In the evening, after sobering up, people dress up and visit friends and family.

Vishnu legend
There is a symbolic legend to explain why Holi is celebrated as a festival of colours in the honour of Hindu god Vishnu and his follower Prahlada. King Hiranyakashipu, according to a legend found in chapter 7 of Bhagavata Purana, was the king of demonic Asuras, and had earned a boon that gave him five special powers: he could be killed by neither a human being nor an animal, neither indoors nor outdoors, neither at day nor at night, neither by astra (projectile weapons) nor by any shastra (handheld weapons), and neither on land nor in water or air. Hiranyakashipu grew arrogant, thought he was God, and demanded that everyone worship only him.

Hiranyakashipu’s own son, Prahlada, however, disagreed. He was and remained devoted to Vishnu. This infuriated Hiranyakashipu. He subjected Prahlada to cruel punishments, none of which affected the boy or his resolve to do what he thought was right. Finally, Holika, Prahlada’s evil aunt, tricked him into sitting on a pyre with her. Holika was wearing a cloak that made her immune to injury from fire, while Prahlada was not. As the fire roared, the cloak flew from Holika and encased Prahlada, who survived while Holika burned. Vishnu, the god who appears as an avatar to restore Dharma in Hindu beliefs, took the form of Narasimha – half human and half lion, at dusk (when it was neither day nor night), took Hiranyakashyapu at a doorstep (which was neither indoors nor outdoors), placed him on his lap (which was neither land, water nor air), and then eviscerated and killed the king with his lion claws (which were neither a handheld weapon nor a launched weapon).

The Holika bonfire and Holi signifies the celebration of the symbolic victory of good over evil, of Prahlada over Hiranyakashipu, and of the fire that burned Holika..

Madhav legend
In the Braj region of India, where the Hindu deity Krishna grew up, the festival is celebrated until Rangpanchmi in commemoration of the divine love of Radha for Madhav. The festivities officially usher in spring, with Holi celebrated as a festival of love. There is a symbolic myth behind commemorating Madhav as well. As a baby, Madhav ( Krishna ) developed his characteristic dark blue skin colour because the she-demon Putana poisoned him with her breast milk. In his youth, Krishna despaired whether the fair-skinned Radha and other girls would like him because of his skin colour. His mother, tired of the desperation, asks him to approach Radha and colour her face in any colour he wanted. This he does, and Radha and Krishna became a couple. Ever since, the playful colouring of Radha’s face has been commemorated as Holi. Beyond India, these legends to explain the significance of Holi (Phagwah) are common in some Caribbean and South American communities of Indian origin such as Guyana and Trinidad and Tobago. It is also celebrated with great fervour in Mauritius.

Other Hindu traditions

Among other Hindu traditions such as Shaivism and Shaktism, the legendary significance of Holi is linked to Shiva in yoga and deep meditation, goddess Parvati wanting to bring back Shiva into the world, seeks help from the Hindu god of love called Kama on Vasant Panchami. The love god shoots arrows at Shiva, the yogi opens his third eye and burns Kama to ashes. This upsets both Kama’s wife Rati (Kamadevi) and his own wife Parvati. Rati performs her own meditative asceticism for forty days, upon which Shiva understands, forgives out of compassion and restores the god of love. This return of the god of love, is celebrated on the 40th day after Vasant Panchami festival as Holi. The Kama legend and its significance to Holi has many variant forms, particularly in South India.

Cultural significance Edit
The Holi festival has a cultural significance among various Hindu traditions of the Indian subcontinent. It is the festive day to end and rid oneself of past errors, to end conflicts by meeting others, a day to forget and forgive. People pay or forgive debts, as well as deal anew with those in their lives. Holi also marks the start of spring, for many the start of the new year, an occasion for people to enjoy the changing seasons and make new friends.

Other Indian religions
The festival has traditionally been also observed by non-Hindus, such as by Jains and Newar Buddhists ( Nepal )

Sikhs have traditionally celebrated the festival, at least through the 19th century, with its historic texts referring to it as Hola. Guru Gobind Singh – the last human guru of the Sikhs – modified Holi with a three-day Hola Mohalla extension festival of martial arts. The extension started the day after the Holi festival in Anandpur Sahib, where Sikh soldiers would train in mock battles, compete in horsemanship, athletics, archery and military exercises.

Holi was observed by Maharaja Ranjit Singh and his Sikh Empire that extended across what are now northern parts of India and Pakistan. According to a report by Tribune India, Sikh court records state that 300 mounds of colours were used in 1837 by Ranjit Singh and his officials in Lahore. Ranjit Singh would celebrate Holi with others in the Bilawal gardens, where decorative tents were set up. In 1837, Sir Henry Fane who was the commander-in-chief of the British Indian army joined the Holi celebrations organised by Ranjit Singh. A mural in the Lahore Fort was sponsored by Ranjit Singh and it showed the Hindu god Krishna playing Holi with gopis. After the death of Ranjit Singh, his Sikh sons and others continued to play Holi every year with colours and lavish festivities. The colonial British officials joined these celebrations.

Description

Radha and the Gopis celebrating Holi, with accompaniment of music instruments
Holi is an important spring festival for Hindus, a national holiday in India and Nepal with regional holidays in other countries. To many Hindus and some non-Hindus, it is a playful cultural event and an excuse to throw coloured water at friends or strangers in jest. It is also observed broadly in the Indian subcontinent. Holi is celebrated at the end of winter, on the last full moon day of the Hindu luni-solar calendar month marking the spring, making the date vary with the lunar cycle.[note 1] The date falls typically in March, but sometimes late February of the Gregorian calendar.

Holi snacks and drinks, post play with colours. Left: salty snacks, Middle: Gujia (a stuffed energy wrap), Right: Thandai (almonds-based chilled drink) to which sometimes intoxicating “bhang” is added.
The festival has many purposes; most prominently, it celebrates the beginning of Spring. In 17th century literature, it was identified as a festival that celebrated agriculture, commemorated good spring harvests and the fertile land.[8] Hindus believe it is a time of enjoying spring’s abundant colours and saying farewell to winter. To many Hindus, Holi festivities mark the beginning of the new year as well as an occasion to reset and renew ruptured relationships, end conflicts and rid themselves of accumulated emotional impurities from the past.

It also has a religious purpose, symbolically signified by the legend of Holika. The night before Holi, bonfires are lit in a ceremony known as Holika Dahan (burning of Holika) or Little Holi. People gather near fires, sing and dance. The next day, Holi, also known as Dhuli in Sanskrit, or Dhulheti, Dhulandi or Dhulendi, is celebrated.

In Northern parts of India, Children and youth spray coloured powder solutions (gulal) at each other, laugh and celebrate, while adults smear dry coloured powder (abir) on each other’s faces.[4][33] Visitors to homes are first teased with colours, then served with Holi delicacies (such as puranpoli, dahi-bada and gujia), desserts and drinks. After playing with colours, and cleaning up, people bathe, put on clean clothes, and visit friends and family.[9]

Like Holika Dahan, Kama Dahanam is celebrated in some parts of India. The festival of colours in these parts is called Rangapanchami, and occurs on the fifth day after Poornima (full moon).

History and rituals Edit
The Holi festival is an ancient Hindu festival with its cultural rituals. It is mentioned in the Puranas, Dasakumara Charita, and by the poet Kālidāsa during the 4th century reign of Chandragupta II. The celebration of Holi is also mentioned in the 7th-century Sanskrit drama Ratnavali. The festival of Holi caught the fascination of European traders and British colonial staff by the 17th century. Various old editions of Oxford English Dictionary mention it, but with varying, phonetically derived spellings: Houly (1687), Hooly (1698), Huli (1789), Hohlee (1809), Hoolee (1825), and Holi in editions published after 1910.[8]

There are several cultural rituals associated with Holi:

Prepare Holika pyre for bonfire
Main article: Holika Dahan

Shops start selling colours for Holi in the days and weeks beforehand
Days before the festival people start gathering wood and combustible materials for the bonfire in parks, community centers, near temples and other open spaces. On top of the pyre is an effigy to signify Holika who tricked Prahalad into the fire. Inside homes, people stock up on pigments, food, party drinks and festive seasonal foods such as gujiya, mathri, malpuas and other regional delicacies.

Holika dahan
On the eve of Holi, typically at or after sunset, the pyre is lit, signifying Holika Dahan. The ritual symbolises the victory of good over evil. People gather around the fire to sing and dance.[9]

Play with colours
Holi frolic and celebrations begin the morning after the Holika bonfire. There is no tradition of holding puja (prayer), and the day is for partying and pure enjoyment. Children and young people form groups armed with dry colours, coloured solution and water guns (pichkaris), water balloons filled with coloured water, and other creative means to colour their targets.[50]

In the Braj region of North India, women have the option to playfully hit men who save themselves with shields; for the day, men are culturally expected to accept whatever women dish out to them. This ritual is called Lath Mar Holi.[51]
Traditionally, washable natural plant-derived colours such as turmeric, neem, dhak, and kumkum were used, but water-based commercial pigments are increasingly used. All colours are used. Everyone in open areas such as streets and parks is game, but inside homes or at doorways only dry powder is used to smear each other’s face. People throw colours and get their targets completely coloured up. It is like a water fight, but with coloured water. People take delight in spraying coloured water on each other. By late morning, everyone looks like a canvas of colours. This is why Holi is given the name “Festival of Colours”.

Groups sing and dance, some playing drums and dholak. After each stop of fun and play with colours, people offer gujiya, mathri, malpuas and other traditional delicacies.[52] Cold drinks, including adult drinks based on local intoxicating herbs,[19] are also part of the Holi festivity.

Other variations

Friends form groups on Holi, play drums and music, sing and dance, as they move from one stop to another.
In the Braj region around Mathura, in north India, the festivities may last more than a week. The rituals go beyond playing with colours, and include a day where men go around with shields and women have the right to playfully beat them on their shields with sticks.[53]

In south India, some worship and make offerings to Kaamadeva, the love god of Indian mythology.

The after party
After a day of play with colours, people clean up, wash and bathe, sober up and dress up in the evening and greet friends and relatives by visiting them and exchanging sweets. Holi is also a festival of forgiveness and new starts, which ritually aims to generate harmony in the society.

Regional names, rituals and celebrations Edit
Holi (Hindi: होली, Nepali: होली, Punjabi: ਹੋਲੀ, Kannada: ಹೋಳಿ) is also known as Phakuwa or Phagwah (Assamese: ফাকুৱা), Festival of Colours, or Dola jātra in Odisha, and as Dol Jatra (Assamese: দ’ল যাত্ৰা) or Basanto utsav (“spring festival”) in West Bengal and Assam. The customs and celebrations vary between regions of India.

Basanto Utsav dancers at Jorasanko Thakurbari.
Basanto Utsav at Jorasanko Thakurbari
Holi is of particular significance in the Braj region, which includes locations traditionally associated with the Lord Krishna: Mathura, Vrindavan, Nandgaon, Uttar Pradesh, and Barsana, which become touristic during the season of Holi.[23]

Outside India, Holi is observed by the minority Hindus in Bangladesh and Pakistan as well in countries with large Indian subcontinent diaspora populations such as Suriname, Guyana, Trinidad and Tobago, South Africa, Malaysia, the United Kingdom, the United States, Canada, Mauritius, and Fiji. The Holi rituals and customs outside South Asia also vary with local adaptations.
Influence on other cultures Edit
Holi celebrations in other cultures
A celebration of Holi festival at UNC college campus United States, March 2011.jpg
UNC[113][114]
Holi One We Are One Colour Festival South Africa 2013 c.jpg
South Africa[115]
A celebration of Holi festival at Stanford University United States, 2009.jpg
Stanford University[116]
Holi, the festival of colors in Germany 2012.jpg
Germany
Holi Festival of Colors Utah, United States 2013.jpg
Utah, United States
Phagwah 2013 parade Holi New York City.jpg
New York City[117]
Holi celebrations in Malaysia 2012.jpg
Malaysia
Holi Festival Celebrations, The Netherlands, 2008.jpg
Netherlands
Holi celebrations at Parque Villa Lobos, 2013.jpg
Brazil
Holi festival in Moscow, Russia.jpg
Russia
The festival of Holi is increasingly celebrated in many parts of the world outside India
Holi is celebrated as a social event in parts of the United States.[118] For example, at Sri Sri Radha Krishna Temple in Spanish Fork, Utah, NYC Holi Hai in Manhattan, New York[119] and Festival of Colors: Holi NYC in New York City, New York,[118][120] Holi is celebrated as the Festival of Color, where thousands of people gather from all over the United States, play and mingle.[3][118][121]

Holi-inspired events Edit
A number of Holi-inspired social events have also surfaced, particularly in Europe and the United States, often organised by companies as for-profit or charity events with paid admission, and with varying scheduling that does not coincide with the actual Holi festival. These have included Holi-inspired music festivals such as the Festival Of Colours Tour and Holi One[122] (which feature timed throws of Holi powder), and 5K run franchises such as The Color Run, Holi Run and Color Me Rad,[123] in which participants are doused with the powder at per-kilometre checkpoints.

There have been concerns that these events appropriate and trivialise aspects of Holi for commercial gain—downplaying or completely ignoring the cultural and spiritual roots of the celebration.[124][125] Organisers of these events have argued that the costs are to cover various key aspects of their events, such as safe colour powders, safety and security, and entertainment

India

Uttar Pradesh
See also: Lath mar Holi

Colour Drenched Gopis in Krishna Temple, Mathura
Barsana, a town near Mathura in the Braj region of Uttar Pradesh, celebrates Lath mar Holi in the sprawling compound of the Radha Rani temple. Thousands gather to witness the Lath Mar Holi when women beat up men with sticks as those on the sidelines become hysterical, sing Holi songs and shout “Sri Radhey” or “Sri Krishna”. The Holi songs of Braj mandal are sung in pure Braj, the local language. Holi celebrated at Barsana is unique in the sense that here women chase men away with sticks. Males also sing provocative songs in a bid to invite the attention of women. Women then go on the offensive and use long staves called lathis to beat the men, who protect themselves with shields.

Mathura, in the Braj region, is the birthplace of Lord Krishna. In Vrindavan this day is celebrated with special puja and the traditional custom of worshipping Lord Krishna; here the festival lasts for sixteen days.[23] All over the Braj region [56] and neighboring places like Hathras, Aligarh, and Agra, Holi is celebrated in more or less the same way as in Mathura, Vrindavan and Barsana.

A play of colours then a dance at a Hindu temple near Mathura, at Holi.
A traditional celebration includes Matki Phod, similar to Dahi Handi in Maharashtra and Gujarat during Krishna Janmashtami, both in the memory of god Krishna who is also called makhan chor (literally, butter thief). This is a historic tradition of the Braj region as well as the western region of India.[57] An earthen pot filled with butter or other milk products is hung high by a rope. Groups of boys and men climb on each other’s shoulder to form pyramids to reach and break it, while girls and women sing songs and throw coloured water on the pyramid to distract them and make their job harder.[58] This ritual sport continues in Hindu diaspora communities.[59]

Outside Braj, in the Kanpur area, Holi lasts seven days with colour. On the last day, a grand fair called Ganga Mela or the Holi Mela is celebrated. This Mela (fair) was started by freedom fighters who fought British rule in the First Indian War of Independence in 1857 under the leadership of Nana Saheb. The Mela is held at various ghats along the banks of the River Ganga in Kanpur, to celebrate the Hindus and Muslims who together resisted the British forces in the city in 1857. On the eve of Ganga Mela, all government offices, shops, and courts generally remain closed. The Ganga Mela marks the official end of “The Festival of Colours” or Holi in Kanpur.[citation needed]

In Gorakhpur, the northeast district of Uttar Pradesh, the day pig Holi starts with a special puja. This day, called “Holi Milan”, is considered to be the most colourful day of the year, promoting brotherhood among the people. People visit every house and sing Holi songs and express their gratitude by applying coloured powder (Abeer). It is also considered the beginning of the year, as it occurs on the first day of the Hindu calendar year (Panchang).

A natural dye-based Holi in Pune, an alternative to synthetic colours

Himachal Pradesh

Though Holi is celebrated in all the 12 Districts of Himachal but major one is Mandi Holi which is celebrated at Seri manch. A huge crowd of most young boys and girls and even elderly collect at center of city and enjoy Holi in it’s full ferver.

Uttarakhand

Kumaoni Holi in Uttarakhand includes a musical affair. It takes different forms such as the Baithki Holi, the Khari Holi and the Mahila Holi. In Baithki Holi and Khari Holi, people sing songs with a touch of melody, fun and spiritualism. These songs are essentially based on classical ragas. Baithki Holi (बैठकी होली), also known as Nirvan Ki Holi, begins from the premises of temples, where Holiyars (होल्यार) sing Holi songs and people gather to participate, along with playing classical music. The songs are sung in a particular sequence depending on the time of day; for instance, at noon the songs are based on Peelu, Bhimpalasi and Sarang ragas, while evening songs are based on the ragas such as Kalyan, Shyamkalyan and Yaman. The Khari Holi (खड़ी होली) is mostly celebrated in the rural areas of Kumaon. The songs of the Khari Holi are sung by the people, who, sporting traditional white churidar payajama and kurta, dance in groups to the tune of ethnic musical instruments such as the dhol and hurka.[citation needed]

Holi celebrations, Pushkar, Rajasthan
In the Kumaon region, the Holika pyre, known as Cheer (चीर), is ceremonially built in a ceremony known as Cheer Bandhan (चीर बंधन) fifteen days before Dulhendi. The Cheer is a bonfire with a green Paiya tree branch in the middle. The Cheer of every village and neighborhood is rigorously guarded as rival mohallas try to playfully steal each other’s cheer.[citation needed]

The colours used on Holi are derived from natural sources. Dulhendi, known as Charadi (छरड़ी) (from Chharad (छरड़)), is made from flower extracts, ash and water. Holi is celebrated with great gusto much in the same way all across North India.[60]

Punjab

The Hola Mohalla in Anandpur Sahib is a popular celebration

In Punjab, Holi is preceded by Holika Dahan the night before. On the day of Holi, people engage in throwing colours[71] on each other.[72]

During Holi in Punjab, walls and courtyards of rural houses are enhanced with drawings and paintings similar to rangoli in South India, mandana in Rajasthan, and rural arts in other parts of India. This art is known as chowk-poorana or chowkpurana in Punjab and is given shape by the peasant women of the state. In courtyards, this art is drawn on cloth. The art includes drawing tree motifs, flowers, ferns, creepers, plants, peacocks, palanquins, geometric patterns along with vertical, horizontal and oblique lines. These arts add to the festive atmosphere

As Holi starts with Holika Dahan on the full moon night of Phagan or Phalgan, the festival of Holi is referred to as the festival of Phalgun even though the actual day of Holi falls on the first day of the lunar month of Chett. Sri Guru Gobind Singh Ji built upon this method of celebrating Holi by adding a martial element and creating Hola Mohalla to be celebrated a day after Holi.

Details

Hola Mahalla is a Sikh event which takes place on the second day of the lunar month of Chet, which usually falls in March.

Mahalia, is a Punjabi word that implies an organized procession in the form of an army column accompanied by war drums and standard-bearers, and proceeding to a given location or moving in state from one place to another.

Holi, when people playfully sprinkle colored powders, dry or mixed in water, on each other[10] on the first day of Chet was given a new dimension by establishing Hola to be celebrated a day after. However, Guru Gobind Singh (1666–1708) held the first march at Anandpur on Chet vadi 1, 1757 Bk (22 February 1701) and therefore festivities start before the second of Chet. In Anandpur Sahib, the festival lasts for three days.[1]

The Guru made Hola Mahalla an occasion for the Sikhs to demonstrate their martial skills in simulated battles. This was probably done to forestall a grimmer struggle against the imperial power and channeling people’s energy into a more useful activity. Hola Mahalla became an annual event held in an open ground near Holgarh, a fort across the rivulet Charan Ganga, northwest of Anandpur sahib.

The popularity of this festival may be judged from the fact that out of five Sikh public holidays requested by the Khalsa Diwan, of Lahore in 1889, the Government approved only two – Hola Mahalla and the birth anniversary of Guru Nanak. Hola Mahalla is presently the biggest festival at Anandpur.

Anandpur Sahib

Anandpur Sahib (lit. City of Bliss) is situated on one of the lower spurs of the Shiwalik Hills in Ropar District of Punjab and is well connected with the rest of the country both by road and rail. It lies 31 km north of Rupnagar (Ropar) and 29 km south of Nangal Township. Being one of the supremely important historical centers of the Sikhs it has been reverently called Anandpur Sahib. It was here at Anandpur that on Baisakhi of 1699, Guru Gobind Singh inaugurated the Khalsa and the Panj Piare (the five beloved ones); hence inaugurating the order of Saint-Soldiers who pledged their dedication to defend the needy, poor and oppressed and their respective social, economic and political rights. This was a tradition of one of the world’s greatest martyrs Guru Tegh Bahadur (the 9th Guru) who laid down his life in the defense of the Hindus on behalf of the Pandits of Kashmir.

The order of the Khalsa, at the wish of Guru Gobind Singh’s would henceforth be distinguished by five symbols (a uniform of 5Ks), viz. Kes (uncut hair), Kangha (comb), Kacherra (drawers), Kara (an all-steel bracelet) and Kirpan (a sword) so that they could easily be recognized by anyone under attack. Sikhs were further instructed to live to the highest ethical standards, and to be always ready to fight tyranny and injustice.

Bihar

Holi is known as Phaguwa in the local Bhojpuri dialect. In this region as well, the legend of Holika is prevalent. On the eve of Phalgun Poornima, people light bonfires. They put dried cow dung cakes, wood of the Araad or Redi tree and Holika tree, grains from the fresh harvest and unwanted wood leaves in the bonfire. At the time of Holika people assemble near the pyre. The eldest member of the gathering or a purohit initiates the lighting. He then smears others with colour as a mark of greeting. Next day the festival is celebrated with colours and a lot of frolic. Traditionally, people also clean their houses to mark the festival.[citation needed]

Holi Milan is also observed in Bihar, where family members and well wishers visit each other’s family, apply colours (abeer) on each other’s faces, and on feet, if elderly. Usually this takes place on the evening of Holi day after Holi with wet colours is played in the morning through afternoon. Due to large-scale internal migration issues faced by the people, recently this tradition has slowly begun to transform, and it is common to have Holi Milan on an entirely different day either before or after the actual day of Holi.

Children and youths take extreme delight in the festival. Though the festival is usually celebrated with colours, in some places people also enjoy celebrating Holi with water solutions of mud or clay. Folk songs are sung at high pitch and people dance to the sound of the dholak (a two-headed hand-drum) and the spirit of Holi. Intoxicating bhang, made from cannabis, milk and spices, is consumed with a variety of mouth-watering delicacies, such as pakoras and thandai, to enhance the mood of the festival.

Gujarat

Celebration of Spring by Krishna and Radha”, 18th-century miniature; in the Guimet Museum, Paris
In Gujarat, Holi is a two-day festival. On the evening of the first day people light the bonfire. People offer raw coconut and corn to the fire. The second day is the festival of colour or “Dhuleti”, celebrated by sprinkling coloured water and applying colours to each other. Dwarka, a coastal city of Gujarat, celebrates Holi at the Dwarkadheesh temple and with citywide comedy and music festivities.[54] Falling in the Hindu month of Phalguna, Holi marks the agricultural season of the rabi crop.

In Ahmedabad in Gujarat, in western India, a pot of buttermilk is hung high over the streets and young boys try to reach it and break it by making human pyramids. The girls try to stop them by throwing coloured water on them to commemorate the pranks of Krishna and the cowherd boys to steal butter and “gopis” while trying to stop the girls. The boy who finally manages to break the pot is crowned the Holi King. Afterwards, the men, who are now very colourful, go out in a large procession to “alert” people of Krishna’s possible appearance to steal butter from their homes.

In some places there is a custom in undivided Hindu families that the woman beats her brother-in-law with a sari rolled up into a rope in a mock rage and tries to drench him with colours, and in turn, the brother-in-law brings sweets (Indian desserts) to her in the evening

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West Bengal

Dol Khela after the end of Basanto Utsav at Jorasanko Thakurbari.
Dol Khela in Kolkata at Thakurbari
In West Bengal, Holi is known by the name of “Dol Jatra”, “Dol Purnima” or the “Swing Festival”. The festival is celebrated in a dignified manner by placing the icons of Krishna and Radha on a picturesquely decorated palanquin which is then taken round the main streets of the city or the village. On the Dol Purnima day in the early morning, students dress up in saffron-coloured or pure white clothes and wear garlands of fragrant flowers. They sing and dance to the accompaniment of musical instruments, such as the ektara, dubri, and veena. The devotees take turns to swing them while women dance around the swing and sing devotional songs. During these activities, the men keep spraying coloured water and coloured powder, abir, at them.

Basanta Utsab at Jorasanko Thakur Bari in 2015
The head of the family observes a fast and prays to Lord Krishna and Agnidev.[citation needed] After all the traditional rituals are over, he smears Krishna’s icon with gulal and offers “bhog” to both Krishna and Agnidev. In Shantiniketan, Holi has a special musical flavour. Visitors on Holi are offered traditional dishes that include malpoa, kheer sandesh, basanti sandesh (saffron), saffron milk, payash, and related foods.

Odisha

An 1822 drawing showing elevation of a black stone arch in Puri, Odisha. It carried Vaishnavite gods and goddess, the ritual noted to be a part of the Holi festival.[62]
The people of Odisha celebrate “Dola” on the day of Holi where the icons of Jagannath replace the icons of Krishna and Radha. Dola Melana, processions of the deities are celebrated in villages and bhoga is offered to the deities. “Dola yatra” was prevalent even before 1560 much before Holi was started where the idols of Jagannatha, Balabhadra and Subhadra used to be taken to the “Dolamandapa” (podium in Jagannath temple).[63] People used to offer natural colours known as “abira” to the deities and apply on each other’s feats.

Andhra Pradesh

In Andhra Pradesh, Holi is celebrated on the full moon day of the month of Phaalgunamu. Holi announces the arrival of spring and the passing of winter. People indulge in merry-making, and playing with coloured waters is a common sight. Peasants visit homes singing folklore and asking for small tips. The Puranas give different version of the destruction of the she-demon, called as Holika. On the morning of Holi, people have fun with coloured water. Men, women and children all participate in this merry making. A bonfire is lit in the evenings, with an effigy of Holika. This is otherwise known as burning of Kamudu. The religious orthodox circle the fire seven times, reciting religious verses. Folklore and dances are performed around the fire to welcome the new season. In the evening, youngsters play with dry colours and seek elders’ blessings.

Assam

Holi, also called Phakuwa (ফাকুৱা) in Assamese, is celebrated all over Assam. Locally called Dol Jatra, associated with Satras of Barpeta, Holi is celebrated over two days. On the first day, the burning of clay huts are seen in Barpeta and lower Assam which signifies the legends of Holika. On the second day of it, Holi is celebrated with colour powders. The Holi songs in chorus devoted to Lord Krishna are also sung in the regions of Barpeta.

Goa

Main article: Shigmo
Holi is a part of the Goan or Konkani spring festival known as Śigmo or शिगमो in Koṅkaṇī or Śiśirotsava, which lasts for about a month. The colour festival or Holi is a part of longer, more extensive spring festival celebrations.[65] Holi festivities (but not Śigmo festivities) include: Holika Puja and Dahan, Dhulvad or Dhuli vandan, Haldune or offering yellow and saffron colour or Gulal to the deity.

Maharashtra

In Maharashtra, Holi Purnima is also celebrated as Shimga, festivities that last five to seven days. A week before the festival, youngsters go around the community, collecting firewood and money. On the day of Shimga, the firewood is heaped into a huge pile in each neighborhood. In the evening, the fire is lit. Every household brings a meal and dessert, in the honour of the fire god. Puran Poli is the main delicacy and children shout “Holi re Holi puranachi poli”. Shimga celebrates the elimination of all evil. The colour celebrations here take place on the day of Rang Panchami, five days after Shimga. During this festival, people are supposed to forget and forgive any rivalries and start new healthy relations with all.

Children celebrating Holi at Pune city in Maharashtra
Manipur Edit
Manipuris celebrate Holi for 6 days. Here, this holiday merges with the festival of Yaosang. Traditionally, the festival commences with the burning of a thatched hut of hay and twigs. Young children go from house to house to collect money, locally known as nakadeng (or nakatheng), as gifts on the first two days. The youths at night perform a group folk dance called Thabal chongba on the full moon night of Lamta (Phalgun), traditionally accompanied by folk songs and rhythmic beats of the indigenous drum, but nowadays by modern bands and fluorescent lamps. In Krishna temples, devotees sing devotional songs, perform dances and celebrate with aber (gulal) wearing traditional white and yellow turbans. On the last day of the festival, large processions are taken out to the main Krishna temple near Imphal where several cultural activities are held. In recent decades, Yaosang, a type of Indian sport, has become common in many places of the valley, where people of all ages come out to participate in a number of sports that are somewhat altered for the holiday.

Kerala

Holi is locally called Ukkuli in Konkani or Manjal Kuli in Malayalam. It is celebrated around the Konkani temple called Gosripuram Thirumala temple.

Karnataka

Traditionally, in rural Karnataka children collect money and wood in the weeks prior to Holi, and on “Kamadahana” night all the wood is put together and lit. The festival is celebrated for two days. People in north Karnataka prepare special food on this day.

Holi Celebration in Andhra Pradesh
In Sirsi, Karnataka, Holi is celebrated with a unique folk dance called “Bedara Vesha”, which is performed during the nights beginning five days before the actual festival day. The festival is celebrated every alternate year in the town, which attracts a large number of tourists from different parts of the India.[66]

Telangana

As in other parts of India, in rural Telangana, children celebrate kamuda and collect money, rice, Mokkajonna and wood for weeks prior to Holi, and on Kamudha night all the wood is put together and set on fire.

Selfie of family celebrating Holi
Tamil Nadu Edit
Tamil Hindus celebrate Holi as it relates to the legend of Kama Deva. Holi is known by three names: Kamavilas, Kaman Pandigai and Kama-Dahanam[67][68][69][70]

Jammu & Kashmir
In Jammu & Kashmir, Holi celebrations are much in line with the general definition of Holi celebrations: a high-spirited festival to mark the beginning of the harvesting of the summer crop, with the throwing of coloured water and powder and singing and dancing.[citation needed]

Nepal

Preparing for Holika Dahan, Kathamandu, Nepal

Locals Celebrating Holi In Kathmandu, Nepal
Holi, along with many other Hindu festivals, is celebrated in Nepal as a national festival. It is an important major Nepal-wide festival along with Dashain and Tihar (Dipawali).[74] It is celebrated in the Nepali month of Phagun (same date as Indian Holi), and signifies the legends of the Hindu god Krishna.[74] Newar Buddhists and others worship Saraswati shrine in Vajrayogini temples and celebrate the festival with their Hindu friends.[75] Traditional concerts are held in most cities in Nepal, including Kathmandu, Narayangarh, Pokhara, Hetauda, and Dharan, and are broadcast on television with various celebrity guests.

People walk through their neighbourhoods to celebrate Holi by exchanging colours and spraying coloured water on one another. A popular activity is the throwing of water balloons at one another, sometimes called lola (meaning water balloon).[76] Many people mix bhang in their drinks and food, as is also done during Shivaratri. It is believed that the combination of different colours at this festival takes all sorrow away and makes life itself more colourful.

Indian diaspora Edit
Over the years, Holi has become an important festival in many regions wherever Indian diaspora were either taken as indentured labourers during colonial era, or where they emigrated on their own, and are now present in large numbers such as in Africa, North America, Europe, Latin America, and parts of Asia such as Fiji.[14][15][77][78]

Suriname

A celebration of Holi Festival in the United States
Holi is a national holiday in Suriname. It is called Phagwa festival, and is celebrated to mark the beginning of spring and Hindu mythology. In Suriname, Holi Phagwa is a festival of colour. It is customary to wear old white clothes on this day, be prepared to get them dirty and join in the colour throwing excitement and party.[79][80]

Trinidad and Tobago
Phagwa is normally celebrated in Trinidad and Tobago on the Sunday closest to the actual date of Phagwah. It is celebrated with a lot of colour and splendour, along with the singing on traditional Phagwah songs or Chowtal (gana).

Guyana

Drummers of Indo-Caribbean community celebrating Phagwah (Holi) in New York City, 2013
Phagwah is a national holiday in Guyana, and peoples of all races and religions participate in the celebrations.[81] The main celebration in Georgetown is held at the Mandir in Prashad Nagar.[82]

Fiji
Indo-Fijians celebrate Holi as festival of colours, folksongs and dances. The folksongs sung in Fiji during Holi season are called phaag gaaian. Phagan, also written as Phalgan, is the last month of the Hindu calendar. Holi is celebrated at the end of Phagan. Holi marks the advent of spring and ripening of crops in Northern India. Not only it is a season of romance and excitement, folk songs and dances, it is also an occasion of playing with powder, perfumes and colours. Many of the Holi songs in Fiji are around the theme of love-relationship between Radha and Krishna.[83]

Mauritius
Holi in Mauritius comes close on the heels of Shivaratri. It celebrates the beginning of spring, commemorating good harvests and the fertile land. Hindus believe it is a time of enjoying spring’s abundant colours and saying farewell to winter. It is considered one of the most exhilarating religious holidays in existence. During this event, participants hold a bonfire, throw coloured powder at each other, and celebrate wildly.[84]

Pakistan Edit
Holi is celebrated by Pakistani Hindus, in various cities in the provinces of Punjab and Sindh, such as Karachi,[85] Hazara,[86] Rawalpindi, Sindh, Hyderabad, Multan and Lahore.[87] Locals in Multan associate Holi and Prahlada[88] with the Prahlada-Puri Temple.[89][90]

Holi was not a public holiday in Pakistan from 1947 to 2016. Holi along with Diwali for Hindus, and Easter for Christians, was adopted as public holiday resolution by Pakistan’s parliament in 2016, giving the local governments and public institutions the right to declare Holi as a holiday and grant leave for its minority communities, for the first time.[91] This decision has been controversial, with some Pakistanis welcoming the decision, while others criticising it, with the concern that declaring Holi a public holiday advertises a Hindu festival to Pakistani children.[92]

Traditional sources of colours Edit

Flowers of Dhak or Palash are used to make traditional colours
The spring season, during which the weather changes, is believed to cause viral fever and cold. The playful throwing of natural coloured powders, called gulal has a medicinal significance: the colours are traditionally made of Neem, Kumkum, Haldi, Bilva, and other medicinal herbs prescribed by Āyurvedic doctors.

Many colours are obtained by mixing primary colours. Artisans produce and sell many of the colours from natural sources in dry powder form, in weeks and months preceding Holi. Some of the traditional natural plant based sources of colours are:[8][93][94]

Orange and red
The flowers of palash or tesu tree, also called the flame of the forest, are typical source of bright red and deep orange colours. Powdered fragrant red sandal wood, dried hibiscus flowers, madder tree, radish and pomegranate are alternate sources and shades of red. Mixing lime with turmeric powder creates an alternate source of orange powder, as does boiling saffron (kesar) in water.

Green
Mehendi and dried leaves of gulmohur tree offer a source of green colour. In some areas, the leaves of spring crops and herbs have been used as source of green pigment.

Yellow

Colours for Holi on sale at a market in Mysore
Haldi (turmeric) powder is the typical source of yellow colour. Sometimes this is mixed with chickpeas, gram or other flour to get the right shade. Bael fruit, amaltas, species of chrysanthemums, and species of marigold are alternate sources of yellow.

Blue
Indigo plant, Indian berries, species of grapes, blue hibiscus and jacaranda flowers are traditional sources of blue colour for Holi.

Magenta and purple
Beetroot is the traditional source of magenta and purple colour. Often these are directly boiled in water to prepare coloured water.

Brown
Dried tea leaves offer a source of brown coloured water. Certain clays are alternate source of brown.

Black
Species of grapes, fruits of amla (gooseberry) and vegetable carbon (charcoal) offer gray to black colours.

Holi powder
Synthetic colours

A young man celebrating Holi
Natural colours were used in the past to celebrate Holi safely by applying turmeric, sandalwood paste, extracts of flowers and leaves. As the spring-blossoming trees that once supplied the colours used to celebrate Holi have become more rare, chemically produced industrial dyes have been used to take their place in almost all of urban India. Due to the commercial availability of attractive pigments, slowly the natural colours are replaced by synthetic colours. As a result, it has caused mild to severe symptoms of skin irritation and inflammation. Lack of control over the quality and content of these colours is a problem, as they are frequently sold by vendors who do not know their origin.

A 2007 study found that malachite green, a synthetic bluish-green dye used in some colours during Holi festival, was responsible for severe eye irritation in Delhi, if eyes were not washed upon exposure. Though the study found that the pigment did not penetrate through the cornea, malachite green is of concern and needs further study.[95]

Another 2009 study reports that some colours produced and sold in India contain metal-based industrial dyes, causing an increase in skin problems to some people in the days following Holi. These colours are produced in India, particularly by small informal businesses, without any quality checks and are sold freely in the market. The colours are sold without labeling, and the consumer lacks information about the source of the colours, their contents, and possible toxic effects. In recent years, several nongovernmental organisations have started campaigning for safe practices related to the use of colours. Some are producing and marketing ranges of safer colours derived from natural sources such as vegetables and flowers.[96]

These reports have galvanised a number of groups into promoting more natural celebrations of Holi. Development Alternatives, Delhi and Kalpavriksh,[97] – Kalpavriksh Environment Action Group, Pune, The CLEAN India campaign[98] and Society for Child Development, through its Avacayam Cooperative Campaign[99] have launched campaigns to help children learn to make their own colours for Holi from safer, natural ingredients. Meanwhile, some commercial companies such as the National Botanical Research Institute have begun to market “herbal” dyes, though these are substantially more expensive than the dangerous alternatives. However, it may be noted that many parts of rural India have always resorted to natural colours (and other parts of festivities more than colours) due to availability.

In urban areas, some people wear nose mask and sun glasses to avoid inhaling pigments and to prevent chemical exposure to eyes

Har khushi apki rahe,
Har muskan apke hothon par saji rahe,
Rang bhare iss tyohar ki tarha,
Apki zindagi bhi rangeen rahe.

निकलो गलियों में बना कर टोली,
भिगा दो आज हर एक की झोली,
कोई मुस्कुरा दे तो उसे गले लगा लो,
वरना निकल लो, लगा के रंग कह के हैप्पी होली।

Share with link http://bit.ly/HoliFestivalofColoursAroundTheWorldBestMedia

KNOW ALL ABOUT THE FESTIVAL OF COLOURS – HOLI Curated Media Tv

HAPPY HOLI | AROUND THE WORLD | FESTIVAL OF COLOURS | KNOW ABOUT HOLI | BEST VISUALS VIDEOS REMIXES SHORT FILMS | CURATED | SDBWP Curated Media TV

Happy Holi World !!!

Holi (Hindi: होली) is a religious spring festival celebrated by Hindus as a festival of colours.

Happy Holi to all !!!!

It is primarily observed in India and Nepal but in modern times it is a Global festival now. It is also observed by the minority Hindus in Bangladesh and Pakistan as well in countries with large Indic diaspora populations following Hinduism, such as

Suriname,

Malaysia,

Guyana,

South Africa,

Trinidad and Tobago,

the United Kingdom,

the United States,

Mauritius, and

Fiji

Outside India, Holi is observed by the minority Hindus in Bangladesh and Pakistan as well in countries with large Indian subcontinent diaspora populations such as Suriname, Guyana, Trinidad and Tobago, South Africa, Malaysia, the United Kingdom, the United States, Canada, Mauritius, and Fiji. The Holi rituals and customs outside South Asia also vary with local adaptations.
Influence on other cultures Edit
Holi celebrations in other cultures

A celebration of Holi festival at UNC college campus United States, March 2011

UNC
Holi One We Are One Colour Festival South Africa 2013 c.jpg
South Africa
A celebration of Holi festival at Stanford University United States, 2009.

Stanford University

Holi, the festival of colors in Germany

Germany

Holi Festival of Colors Utah, United States 2013.jpg
Utah, United States
Phagwah 2013 parade Holi New York City

New York City
Holi celebrations in Malaysia 2012.jpg
Malaysia
Holi Festival Celebrations, The Netherlands, 2008.jpg
Netherlands
Holi celebrations at Parque Villa Lobos, 2013.

Brazil
Holi festival in Moscow, Russia.jpg
Russia
The festival of Holi is increasingly celebrated in many parts of the world outside India
Holi is celebrated as a social event in parts of the United States.[118] For example, at Sri Sri Radha Krishna Temple in Spanish Fork, Utah, NYC Holi Hai in Manhattan, New York[119] and Festival of Colors: Holi NYC in New York City, New York,[118][120] Holi is celebrated as the Festival of Color, where thousands of people gather from all over the United States, play and mingle.

Holi-inspired events

A number of Holi-inspired social events have also surfaced, particularly in Europe and the United States, often organised by companies as for-profit or charity events with paid admission, and with varying scheduling that does not coincide with the actual Holi festival. These have included Holi-inspired music festivals such as the Festival Of Colours Tour and Holi One (which feature timed throws of Holi powder), and 5K run franchises such as The Color Run, Holi Run and Color Me Rad,[123] in which participants are doused with the powder at per-kilometre checkpoints.

There have been concerns that these events appropriate and trivialise aspects of Holi for commercial gain—downplaying or completely ignoring the cultural and spiritual roots of the celebration. Organisers of these events have argued that the costs are to cover various key aspects of their events, such as safe colour powders, safety and security, and entertainment

Many countries Australia Portugal UAE and many more celebrate Holi in full ferver as visible in these Curated Videos here below

निकलो गलियों में बना कर टोली,
भिगा दो आज हर एक की झोली,
कोई मुस्कुरा दे तो उसे गले लगा लो,
वरना निकल लो, लगा के रंग कह के हैप्पी होली।

Share with link http://bit.ly/HoliFestivalofColoursAroundTheWorldBestMedia

Australia

New Zealand

Portugal

Lisbon

Brazil

India

UK

London

Others

Italy

Milano

Playlist

Join Mandi Holi Page on Facebook

https://www.facebook.com/MandiHoliAtSeriManch/

Holi is also known as Phagwah (Assamese: ফাকুৱা), Festival of Colours, or Doḷajātra (Oriya: ଦୋଳଯାତ୍ରା) in Odisha, and as Dol Jatra (Bengali: দোলযাত্রা) or Basantotsav (“spring festival”) (Bengali: বসন্তোৎসব) in West Bengal and Assam.

F celebrating Holi, with accompaniment of music instruments

Every year, thousands of Hindus participate in the festival Holi. The festival has many purposes. First and foremost, it celebrates the beginning of the new season, spring. Originally, it was a festival that commemorated good harvests and the fertile land. Hindus believe it is a time of enjoying spring’s abundant colors and saying farewell to winter. It also has a religious purpose, commemorating events present in Hindu mythology. Although it is the least religious holiday, it is probably one of the most exhilarating ones in existence. During this event, participants hold a bonfire, throw colored powder at each other, and celebrate wildly.

Rangapanchami occurs a few days later on a Panchami (fifth day of the full moon), marking the end of festivities involving colors.

The main day, Holi, also known as Dhuli in Sanskrit, or Dhulheti, Dhulandi or Dhulendi, is celebrated by people throwing scented powder and perfume at each other. Bonfires are lit on the eve of the festival, also known as Holika Dahan (burning of Holika) or Chhoti Holi (little Holi), after which holika dahan prayers are said and praise is offered. The bonfires are lit in memory of the miraculous escape that young Prahlad accomplished when Demoness Holika, sister of Hiranyakashipu, carried him into the fire. Holika was burnt but Prahlad, a staunch devotee of god Vishnu, escaped without any injuries due to his devotion. Holika Dahan is referred to as Kama Dahanam in South India.
Holi is celebrated at the end of the winter season on the last full moon day of the lunar month Phalguna (February/March), (Phalgun Purnima), which usually falls in the later part of February or March. In 2009, Holi (‘Dhulandi’) was on March 11 and Holika Dahan was on March 10. In 2010, Holi was on March 1 and Holika Dahan was on February 28. In 2011, Holi was on March 20 and Holika Dahan was on March 19. In 2012, Holi was on March 8.

In most areas, Holi lasts about two days. Holi lowers (but does not remove completely) the strictness of social norms, which includes gaps between age, gender, status, and caste. Together, the rich and poor, women and men, enjoy each other’s presence on this day. No one expects polite behavior; as a result, the atmosphere is filled with excitement, fun and joy.
Though there have been references in Sanskrit texts to similar festivals, like ratnavali where people sprayed coloured waters using bamboo syringes, the origin of the modern Holi festival has been traced to ancient Bengal. It was a Gaudiya Vaishnav festival, in accordance to Vaishnaviya Tantra. People went to Krishna temples, applied red color to the icon and then distributed the red coloured powder or Abir along with malpua prasad to family and friends. Red signified the colour of passion and Lord Krishna is the king of desires. The ritual signified that all our desires should be diverted for the attainment of Krishna and for the well being of society.

In some cultures though, the ritual of burning wood and leaves on the full moon night already existed. This ritual was to signify the end of winter and full advent of spring. Old wood and leaves that had fallen were burnt to signify that it was time for new leaves and flowers. People then smeared their bodies with ash. Later, however, the story of Holika Dahan became associated with this ritual.
Rituals

The earliest textual reference to the celebration of Holi is found in the 7th century Sanskrit drama, Ratnavali.

Certainly there are perennial rituals attached to Holi: the first is smearing of coloured powder on each other, and throwing coloured and scented water at each time. On the first day of this festival, Hindus participate in a public bonfire. Prior to the event, men prepare for this by collecting extra wood. The fire itself is lit near midnight, as the moon rises. The main custom of Holi is the use of the colored powders and water on others. This is why Holi is given the name “Festival of Colors.”

Regional rituals and celebrations

India

Gujarat

The Holi celebration has its celebrative origins in Gujarat, particularly with dance, food, music, and colored powder to offer a spring parallel of Navratri, Gujarat’s Hindu festival celebrated in the fall. Falling on the full moon day in the month of Phalguna, Holi is a major Hindu festival and marks the agricultural season of the Rabi crop.
A bonfire is lit in the main squares of the villages and colonies. People gather around the bonfire and celebrate the event with singing and dancing, which is symbolic of the victory of good over evil. Tribals of Gujarat celebrate Holi with great enthusiasm and also dance around the fire.

In Western India, Ahmedabad in Gujarat, a pot of buttermilk is hung high on the streets and young boys try to reach it and break it by making human pyramids. The girls try to stop them by throwing coloured water on them to commemorate the pranks of Krishna and cowherd boys to steal butter and ‘gopis’ while trying to stop the girls. The boy who finally manages to break the pot is crowned the Holi King. Afterwards, the men, who are now very colourful men, go out in a large procession to “alert” people of the Krishna’s possible appearance to steal butter from their homes.
In some places, there is a custom in the undivided Hindu families that the women of the families beat their brother-in-law with her sari rolled up into a rope in a mock rage as they try to drench them with colours, and in turn, the brothers-in-law bring sweetmeats to her in the evening.[3]
Uttar Pradesh

“Celebration of Spring by Krishna and Radha”, 18th Century miniature; in the Guimet Museum, Paris
Barsana is the place to be at the time of Holi. Here the famous Lath mar Holi is played in the sprawling compound of the Radha Rani temple. Thousands gather to witness the Lath Mar holi when women beat up men with sticks as those on the sidelines become hysterical, sing Holi Songs and shout Sri Radhey or Sri Krishna. The Holi songs of Braj mandal are sung in pure Braj Bhasha.

Holi played at Barsana is unique in the sense that here women chase men away with sticks. Males also sing provocative songs in a bid to invite the attention of women. Women then go on the offensive and use long staves called lathis to beat men folk who protect themselves with shields.
In Mathura, the birthplace of Lord Krishna, and in Vrindavan this day is celebrated with special puja and the traditional custom of worshipping Lord Krishna, here the festival lasts for sixteen days.[1] All over the Braj region and its nearby places like Hathras, Aligarh, Agra the Holi is celebrated in more or less same way as in Mathura, Vrindavan and Barsana.
In Kanpur Holi lasts 7 days with color and a grand fair called Ganga Mela or the Holi Mela that was started by freedom fighters who freed Kanpur from British rule after the First Indian War of Independence in 1857 under the leadership of Nana Saheb. Nana Saheb had declared India free from British rule on June 17th, 1857 in Kanpur. His declaration lead to a series of accidents and hundreds of freedom fighters lost their lives in that fight. Since then people started this Ganga Mela where they play Holi at various Ghats along the banks of River Ganga in Kanpur. This Ganga Mela which has been played since more than 150 years depicts the Ganga-Jamuni Tehzeeb or the Hindu-Muslim Unity in the city. In 1857, the Hindus and the Muslims had combined to resist the British forces in the city. People of all castes, creeds, religion and societies together participate in this huge social congregation. On the eve of Ganga Mela, all Government offices, shops, Courts generally remain closed. Major Business groups, politicians, MLA’s and MP’s all gather on the Ghats to enjoy the Ganga Mela. The Ganga Mela which takes place mostly on the seventh day after Holi marks the official end of “The Festival of Colours” or Holi in Kanpur.
In Gorakhpur, the northeast district of Uttar Pradesh, this day is celebrated with special puja in the morning of Holi day. This day is considered to be the happiest and most colourful day of the year promoting the brotherhood among the people. This is known as “Holi Milan” in which people visit every house and sing holi song and express their gratitude by applying coloured powder (Abeer). Holi is also considered as the begining of the year as it occurs on the first day of new Hindu calendar year . People also kickoff for the next year planning with new year Hindu calendar (Panchang) at the evening of Holi.
Kumaon, (Uttarakhand)
Main article: Kumauni Holi
The uniqueness of the Kumaoni Holi of the Kumaon region in Uttarakhand lies in its being a musical affair, whichever may be its form, be it the Baithki Holi, the Khari Holi and the Mahila Holi which starts from Basant Panchmi. The Baithki Holi and Khari Holi are unique in that the songs on which they are based have a touch of melody, fun and spiritualism. These songs are essentially based on classical ragas. No wonder then the Baithki Holi is also known as Nirvan Ki Holi.
The Baithki Holi (बैठकी होली) begins from the premises of temples, where Holiyars (होल्यार), (the singers of Holi songs) as also the people gather to sing songs to the accompaniment of classical music.
Kumaonis are very particular about the time when the songs based on ragas should be sung. For instance, at noon the songs based on Peelu, Bhimpalasi and Sarang ragas are sung while evening is reserved for the songs based on the ragas like Kalyan, Shyamkalyan and Yaman etc.
The Khari Holi (खड़ी होली), is mostly celebrated in the rural areas of Kumaon. The songs of the Khari Holi are sung by the people, who sporting traditional white churidar payajama and kurta, dance in groups to the tune of ethnic musical instruments like the Dhol and Hurka.
The Holika made is known as Cheer (चीर) which is ceremonically made in a ceremony known as Cheer Bandhan (चीर बंधन) fifteen days before Dulhendi. The Cheer is a bonfire with a green Paiya tree branch in the middle. The Cheer of every village and mohalla is rigorously guarded as rival mohallas try to steal the others cheer.
Dulhendi known as Charadi (छरड़ी), in Kumaoni (from Chharad (छरड़), or natural colours made from flower extracts, ash and water) is celebrated with great gusto much in the same way as all across North India.[4]
Bihar
Holi is celebrated with the same fervour and charm in Bihar as in rest of north India. It is known as Phaguwa in the local Bhojpuri dialect. Here too, the legend of Holika is prevalent. On the eve of Phalgun Poornima, people light bonfires. They put dung cakes, wood of Araad or Redi tree and Holika tree, grains from the fresh harvest and unwanted wood leaves in the bonfire. Following the tradition people also clean their houses for the day.
At the time of Holika people assemble near the fire. The eldest member or a purohit initiates the lighting. He then smears others with colour as a mark of greeting. Next day the festival is celebrated with colours and lot of frolic.
Children and youths take extreme delight in the festival. Though the festival is usually played with colours at some places people also enjoy playing Holi with mud. Folk songs are sung at high pitch and people dance to the tune of dholak and the spirit of Holi.
Intoxicating bhang is consumed with a variety of mouth watering delicacies such as pakoras and thandai to enhance the mood of the festival. Vast quantities of liquor are consumed alongside ganja and bhang, which is sometimes added to foodstuffs.

Holi being played in the courtyard, circa 1795 painting- Patna style.
Bengal
On the Dol Purnima day in the early morning, the students dress up in saffron-coloured or pure white clothes and wear garlands of fragrant flowers. They sing and dance to the accompaniment of musical instruments like ektara, dubri, veena, etc. Holi is known by the name of ‘Dol Jatra’, ‘Dol Purnima’ or the ‘Swing Festival’. The festival is celebrated in a dignified manner by placing the icons of Krishna and Radha on a picturesquely decorated palanquin which is then taken round the main streets of the city or the village. The devotees take turns to swing them while women dance around the swing and sing devotional songs. During these activities, the men keep spraying coloured water and coloured powder, abir, at them.
The head of the family, observes fast and prays to Lord Krishna and Agnidev. After all the traditional rituals are over, he smears Krishna’s icon with gulal and offers “bhog” to both Krishna and Agnidev.
In Shantiniketan, Holi has a special musical flavor.
Traditional dishes include malpoa, kheer sandesh, basanti sandesh (saffron), saffron milk, payash, and related foods.
Odisha
The people of Odisha celebrate Holi in a similar manner but here the icons of Jagannath, the deity of the Jagannath Temple of Puri, replace the icons of Krishna and Radha.
Assam
Holi also called Phakuwa(ফাকুৱা) in Assamese is celebrated all over Assam in Falgun month of Assamese Calander. Dol Jatra is the main festival associated with Satras of Barpeta during which Holi is played. Dol Jatra is of two days festival and in the second day of it, Holi is played with colour powders. The Holi songs in chorus devoted to Lord Krishna are also sung in the regions of Barpeta. The burning of clay huts are seen in Barpeta and lower Assam which signifies the legends of Holika.
Goa
Holi is a part of Goan or Konkani spring festival known as Śigmo or शिगमो in Koṅkaṇī. One of the most prominent festivals of the Konkani community in Goa, and the Konkani diaspora in the state of Karnataka, Maharashtra and Kerala. Śigmo is also known as Śiśirotsava and lasts for about a month. The colour festival or Holi is a part of entire spring festival celebrations.[5]
Holi festivities(but not Śigmo festivities), include:Holika Puja and Dahan,Dhulvad or Dhuli vandan,Haldune or offering yellow and saffron colour or Gulal to the deity.
Main article: Shigmo

Holi celebrations, Pushkar, Rajasthan.

Narayani Shastri, an actress celebrating Holi with her friend at Mumbai, 2011.
Maharashtra
In Maharashtra, Holi is mainly associated with the burning of Holika. Holi Paurnima is also celebrated as Shimga. A week before the festival, youngsters go around the community, collecting firewood and money. On the day of Holi, the firewood is arranged in a huge pile at a clearing in the locality. In the evening, the fire is lit. Every household makes an offering of a meal and dessert to the fire god. Puran Poli is the main delicacy and children shout “Holi re Holi puranachi poli”. Shimga is associated with the elimination of all evil. The colour celebrations here traditionally take place on the day of Rangapanchami, 5 days after Holi, unlike in North India where it is done on the second day itself. During this festival, people are supposed to forget about any rivalries and start new healthy relations with all.
Manipur
Manipuris celebrate Holi for six days. Here, this holiday merges with the centuries-old festival of Yaosang. Traditionally, the festival commences with the burning of a thatched hut of hay and twigs. Young children go from house to house to collect money, locally known as nakadeng (or nakatheng), as gifts on the first two days. The youths at night perform a group folk dance called Thabal chongba on the full moon night of Lamta (Phalgun) along with folk songs and rhythmic beats of the indigenous drum. However, this moonlight party now has modern bands and fluorescent lamps. In Krishna temples, devotees sing devotional songs, perform dances and play with aber (gulal) wearing traditional white and yellow turbans. On the last day of the festival, large processions are taken out to the main Krishna temple near Imphal where several cultural activities are held. Since the past few decades Yaoshang, a type of Indian sport, has become common in many places of the valley, where people of all ages come out to participate in a number of sports that are somewhat altered for the holiday.
Kerala

Holi celebrations at College of Engineering, Adoor Kerala
In the Mattancherry area of Kochi, there are 22 different communities living together in harmony. The Gaud Sarawat Brahmins (GSB) who speak Konkani also celebrate Holi in Cherlai area of West Kochi instead of in theior own community. It is locally called Ukkuli in Konkani or Manjal Kuli in Malayalam. It is celebrated around the Konkani temple called Gosripuram Thirumala temple. Holi is also celebrated at some colleges in south.
Karnataka

Colours Holi at a market in Mysore
Holi is celebrated with much fervor here. Unlike in the other Indian communities, it is also here a school holiday. There is also a tradition followed in rural Karnataka where children collect money and wood for weeks prior to Holi, and on Kamadhana night all the wood is put together and lit. The festival is celebrated for two days. People in north Karnataka prepare special food on this day.
Andhra Pradesh
Holi is celebrated with fun and frolic in Andhra Pradesh. Different in the other Indian communities, The school holidays are here. There is also a tradition followed in rural Telangana region where children play kamuda and collect money, Rice, Mokkajonna and wood for weeks prior to Holi, and on Kamadhana night all the wood is put together and set on fire. The festival is celebrated for two days. In Andhra Pradesh Holi is celebrated along with Basnata Panchami. In the Telangana region and the capital city of Hyderabad, Holi is a major festival, and the festivities and colour starts appearing at least a day before the actual holiday.
Jammu & Kashmir
In Kashmir, Muslims and Hindus alike celebrate Holi. Holi celebrations here pretty much fit the general definition of Holi celebrations: a high-spirited festival to mark the beginning of the harvesting of the summer crop, is marked by the throwing of coloured water and powder and singing and dancing. Holi is also celebrated in great fervor in Jammu.

Holi celebrations by the India Student Association at University of New Mexico
Western Madhya Pradesh
In western Madhya Pradesh, Bhil tribesmen who have held on to many of the pre-Hindu customs celebrate it in a special way.
Rural Maharashtra State
Known as Rangapanchami in rural Maharashtra State, it is celebrated with singing and dancing.
Jaisalmer, Rajasthan
In Jaisalmer, a town in Rajasthan, music is played as clouds of different coloured powders fill the air.
Haryana & Western Uttar Pradesh
This region has its own variety of Holi. The festival is celebrated with great zest and enthusiasm. Dhampur is a city and a municipal board in the Bijnor district in the state of Uttar Pradesh of India. The Holi celebration in Dhampur is famous throughout the whole of Western UP.
Dhampur
In Dhampur holi—holi hawan jaloos have been organized for the last 60 years. The festival involves almost 10,000 people, including lots of bands and Jhakhi, which represent the cultural values of Holi and India.
Indian diaspora
Over the years, Holi has become an important festival in many regions wherever Indian diaspora had found its roots, be it in Africa, North America, Europe or closer to home in South Asia.[6]
Nepal

Holika Dahan, Kathamandu, Nepal.
In Nepal, Holi is celebrated in the month of Falgun and is also called as the “Fagu” and is celebrated on the Full moon day in the month of February. The word “Fagu” (Devanagari:फागु) represents the month of Falgun and the day is called the “Fagu Poornima” (Devanagari:फागु पुर्णीमा) which means (full moon day in the Falgun).
In Nepal Holi is regarded as one of the greatest festivals as important as Dashain (also known as Dussehra in India) and Tihar or Dipawali (also known as Diwali in India). Since more than 80% of people in Nepal are Hindus,[7] Holi, along with many other Hindu festivals, is celebrated in Nepal as a national festival and almost everyone celebrates it regardless of their religion, e.g., even Muslims celebrate it. Christians may also join in, although since Holi falls during Lent, many would not join in the festivities. The day of Holi is also a national holiday in Nepal.
People walk down their neighbourhoods to celebrate Holi by exchanging colours and spraying coloured water on one another. A popular activity is the throwing of water balloons at one another, sometimes called lola (meaning water balloon).[8] Also a lot of people mix bhang in their drinks and food, as also done during Shivaratri. It is believed that the combination of different colours played at this festival take all the sorrow away and make life itself more colourful.
Trinidad and Tobago
Phagwa is normally celebrated in Trinidad and Tobago on the Sunday closest to the actual date of Phagwa. It is celebrated with lots of colour and splendor along with the singing on traditional Phagwa songs or Chowtaal.
Guyana
Phagwah is a national holiday in Guyana, and peoples of all races and religions participate in the celebrations.[9] The main celebration in Georgetown is held at the Mandir in Prashad Nagar.[10]
Traditional Holi

Flowers of Dhak or Palash are used to make traditional colours
The spring season, during which the weather changes, is believed to cause viral fever and cold. The playful throwing of natural coloured powders has a medicinal significance: the colours are traditionally made of Neem, Kumkum, Haldi, Bilva, and other medicinal herbs prescribed by Āyurvedic doctors.
Modern issues

Synthetic colors

A young man celebrating Holi
Natural colors were used in the past to play safe Holi by applying turmeric, sandalwood paste, extracts of flowers and leaves. As the spring-blossoming trees that once supplied the colors used to celebrate Holi have become more rare, chemically produced industrial dyes have been used to take their place in almost all of urban India. Due to the commercial availability of various attractive color pigments, slowly the natural colors are replaced by synthetic colors. As a result it has caused, mild to severe symptoms of skin irritation and inflammation.
In 2001, a fact sheet was published by the groups Toxics link and Vatavaran based in Delhi on the chemical dyes used in the festival.[11] They found safety issues with all three forms in which the Holi colors are produced: pastes, dry colors and water colors.
Their investigation found some toxic chemicals with some potentially severe health impacts. The black powders were found to contain lead oxide which can result in renal failure. The prussian blue used in the blue powder has been associated with contact dermatitis, while the copper sulphate in the green has been documented to cause eye allergies, puffiness of the eyes, or temporary blindness.[12]

A Natural Holi in Pune, an alternative to synthetic colors
The colorant used in the dry colors, also called gulals, was found to be toxic, with heavy metals causing asthma, skin diseases and temporary blindness. Both of the commonly used bases—asbestos or silica—are associated with health issues.[12]
They reported that the wet colors might lead to skin discolouration and dermatitis due to their use of color concentrate gentian violet.
Malachite green – another synthetic bluish-green dye has been well documented to be responsible in Holi festival for many of the severe forms of eye irritation in Delhi.[13]
Lack of control over the quality and content of these colors is a problem, as they are frequently sold by vendors who do not know their origin.
The report galvanized a number of groups into promoting more natural celebrations of Holi. Development Alternatives, Delhi and Kalpavriksh,[14] Pune, The CLEAN India campaign[15] and Society for Child Development, through its Avacayam Cooperative Campaign [3] have both launched campaigns to help children learn to make their own colors for Holi from safer, natural ingredients. Meanwhile, some commercial companies such as the National Botanical Research Institute have begun to market “herbal” dyes, though these are substantially more expensive than the dangerous alternatives. However, it may be noted that many parts of rural India have always resorted to natural colours (and other parts of festivities more than colors) due to availability reasons.
Environmental impact
An alleged environmental issue related to the celebration of Holi is the traditional Holika Dahan bonfire, which is believed to contribute to deforestation. A local tabloid had a view published that 30,000 bonfires each burning approximately 100 kg of wood are lit in one season.[16] Several methods of preventing this consumption of wood have been proposed, including the replacement of wood with waste material or lighting of a single fire per community, rather than multiple smaller fires. However, the idea of lighting waste material antagonizes large sections of a certain community who take it as a Western attack to their cultures and traditions citing several examples of similar festivities elsewhere. There is also concern about the large scale wastage of water and water-pollution due to synthetic colors during Holi celebration.
Influence on other cultures

Color in Motion and Color Me Rad 5K color runs are starting to spread over the United States. They combine the bright colors of Holi with the intensity of a 5K race. Runners show up wearing white running outfits and every kilometer they run, they are doused in a different color.
In the music video for their song “The Catalyst”, American rock band Linkin Park incorporated scenes of band members throwing powdered color at one another. The videos director, band turntablist Joe Hahn, identifies Holi as a direct influence on the visual style of the video.[17] Hahn states that “The irony of making the video was that the inspiration for the colors came from the Color Festival in India called Holi.” Mr Hahn further elaborates on the religious significance of the colors, “People collect these pigments throughout the year to release them in this festival as a celebration of life and tribute to Vishnu.”[17]
South African based Electro-Swing dance group Goodluck released a song “The Vision” wherein Holi is also seen as an influence.
The holi festival was featured as a RoadBlock challenge in the popular CBS reality television show The Amazing Race 13, episode 7.
The Ke$ha music video for the song “Take It Off” features powdered colored dyes similar to those used to celebrate Holi.[18]
The music video for Regina Spektor’s song “Fidelity” depicts a couple in an achromatic set throwing and playing in powdered pigments.[19]
On May 31, 2007, the independent film Outsourced premiered at the Seattle International Film Festival. The plot of the film details the story of Todd Anderson, an American call center novelty products salesman (Josh Hamilton) as he heads to India to train his replacement after his entire department is outsourced to a new, much cheaper call center in Gharapuri, India. Todd soon discovers that in order to successfully train his new charges, he must first learn about the culture of the workers. A Holi celebration is the catalyst for this change in his attitude.[20]
On September 18, 2009, in an episode of the USA_Network series Psych entitled “Bollywood Homicide,” Holi is first depicted on an American network television. [21]
The March 17th, 2011 episode of the NBC series based on the film of the same name, Outsourced, entitled “Todd’s Holi War,” takes a more sitcom-oriented approach to the holiday, marking Holi’s second appearance on American network television.
The music video “Behind the Cow,” which appears to be set in India, by the band Scooter features a final scene with everyone throwing colored powder at one another.
In the British TV show An Idiot Abroad, Episode #2 has host Karl Pilkington take a trip through Dehli, India where he experiences Holi as locals cover him with colored powder and paint.[22]
Episode 4.6 of the TV show Psych, “Bollywood Homicide,” climaxes at a color festival where Shawn is distracted by someone throwing red powder at him.
Keith Olbermann shows clips from Holi festivals every year on the “Time Marches On” portion of his nightly Countdown news show.
Sri Sri Radha Krishna Temple in Spanish Fork, Utah celebrates Holi and is known as Festival of Color where thousands of people gather from all over the country.
The music video for the song “The City” by French DJ Madeon is centered around a full-out color war between two different factions of youngsters. In it, the powders are packed in plastic bags for a longer throw.[23]
See also

Kumauni Holi
Songkran (Thai festival)

Holi – the festival of colours India

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